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Thailand

A Coup Ordained? Thailand’s Prospects for Stability

Asia Report N°263, 3 December 2014

Thai soldiers stand guard during a coup at the Army Club where Thailand's army chief held a meeting with all rival factions in central Bangkok May 22, 2014.

Martial law has brought calm but not peace to Thailand’s febrile politics. The military regime’s stifling of dissent precludes a frank dialogue on the kingdom’s future and could lead to greater turmoil than that which brought about the May 2014 coup.

Recent Reports

A Coup Ordained? Thailand’s Prospects for Stability, Asia Report N°263, 3 Dec 2014

Martial law has brought calm but not peace to Thailand’s febrile politics. The military regime’s stifling of dissent precludes a frank dialogue on the kingdom’s future and could lead to greater turmoil than that which brought about the May 2014 coup.

Thailand: The Evolving Conflict in the South, Asia Report N°241, 11 Dec 2012

After a decade of violence, the capabilities of Malay-Muslim insurgents in Thailand’s Deep South are outpacing the counter-measures of successive governments in Bangkok that have been mired in complacency and protracted national-level political disputes.

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Waging Peace: ASEAN and the Thai-Cambodian Border Conflict , Asia Report N°215, 6 Dec 2011

The violent border clashes between Thailand and Cambodia earlier this year have challenged the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) to turn its rhetoric into action, but to achieve peace and security more robust diplomacy is required to end a still unresolved conflict.

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Thailand: The Calm Before Another Storm?, Asia Briefing N°121, 11 Apr 2011

If Thailand is to minimise the risk of renewed demonstrations and violence, it needs to ensure that forthcoming elections are free and fair and that a legitimate government is formed without any interference from the elite establishment.

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Stalemate in Southern Thailand, Asia Briefing N°113, 3 Nov 2010

The Thai government needs to break the stalemate in the southern insurgency by seriously pursuing political solutions, including addressing past injustices, engaging in dialogue with Malay Muslim militants, and exploring new governance arrangements.

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Bridging Thailand’s Deep Divide, Asia Report Nº192, 5 Jul 2010

The Thai government should immediately lift the state of emergency to create conditions for national reconciliation that would allow the building of a new political consensus and the holding of peaceful elections if the country is to return to stability.

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Conflict Risk Alert: Thailand, Conflict Risk Alert, 30 Apr 2010

The Thai political system has broken down and seems incapable of pulling the country back from the brink of widespread conflict. The stand-off in the streets of Bangkok between the government and Red Shirt protesters is worsening and could deteriorate into an undeclared civil war.

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Southern Thailand: Moving towards Political Solutions?, Asia Report N°181, 8 Dec 2009

On taking office, Thai Prime Min­­ister Abhisit Vejjajiva pledged to reclaim policy on the southern insurgency from the military.

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Recruiting Militants in Southern Thailand, Asia Report N°170, 22 Jun 2009

While Thai leaders are preoccupied with turmoil in Bangkok, the insurgency in the South continues to recruit young Malay Muslims, especially from private Islamic schools.

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Thailand: Calming the Political Turmoil, Asia Briefing N°82, 22 Sep 2008

Street protests are threat­ening to bring down the government led by the People Power Party (PPP) just nine months after it won a decisive victory in general elections.

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Conflict Alert

Thailand

Thailand: Conflict Alert
13 Jan 2014
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Conflict Risk Alert: Thailand
30 Apr 2010
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Podcast

Thailand: Bridging The Divide

5 July 2010: Jim Della-Giacoma, Crisis Group's South East Asia Project Director, explains how despite an outbreak of violence between April and May, in which thousands of demonstrators were killed and injured, Thailand's military-backed government currently has few real solutions on offer. Listen