Chad: Between Ambition and Fragility
Chad: Between Ambition and Fragility
Table of Contents
  1. Executive Summary
Tchad : le choix de Mahamat Déby
Tchad : le choix de Mahamat Déby
People walk on the N'Gueli bridge, marking the border between Chad and Cameroon near N'Djamena, 4 April 2015. AFP PHOTO/PHILIPPE DESMAZES
People walk on the N'Gueli bridge, marking the border between Chad and Cameroon near N'Djamena, 4 April 2015. AFP PHOTO/PHILIPPE DESMAZES
Report 233 / Africa

Chad: Between Ambition and Fragility

Ahead of Chad’s presidential election on 10 April popular discontent is rising amid a major economic crisis, growing intra-religious tensions and deadly Boko Haram attacks. The regime that portrays itself as spearheading the fight against regional jihadism could see all sorts of violent actors gain influence at home if it pursues exclusionary politics and denies its people a viable social contract.

  • Share
  • Save
  • Print
  • Download PDF Full Report

Executive Summary

Chad has become an important partner of the West in the fight against jihadism in the Sahel, but the regime’s stress points are quickly growing and 2016 is proving to be a challenging year. In addition to mounting tensions ahead of the 10 April presidential election and growing social discontent, the country is facing a major economic crisis, growing intra-religious tensions and deadly Boko Haram attacks, even as the movement weakens. The government’s predominantly military approach, pursued at the expense of political and social engagement in areas affected by jihadist violence, risks exacerbating tensions. Meanwhile, as an election approaches that is likely to see President Idriss Déby win a fifth term, many Chadians believe that the absence of democratic change or a viable succession plan could lead to a violent crisis. It is imperative to open political space and create sustainable state institutions capable of gaining the people’s support. This will require a shift in strategy by both national authorities and their international partners.

Until recently, Chad was considered a poor country, lacking in influence and facing the constant threat of its rebellions. But this has changed: Chad normalised relations with Sudan in 2010, began producing oil and became a critical military power in the Sahel-Saharan strip in particular, but also further south, in the Central African Republic (CAR). By deploying its soldiers on multiple fronts, including in a heavily-criticised intervention in CAR, as well as in Mali and more recently in the Lake Chad basin to fight Boko Haram, the regime is pursuing a strategy of military diplomacy, hoping to lead the fight against terrorism in the region. In so doing, Chad has consolidated its alliances with Western countries founded on fighting a common enemy, but which some Chadians view as an insurance policy for a regime that lacks legitimacy. The nature of this partnership, rooted in a long history of close relations with the West, carries significant political and democratic risks.

Chad remains domestically fragile and is facing an unprecedented security threat. The country, which has traditionally experienced ethno-regional rebellions, is today engaged in a new kind of fight: an asymmetric battle against the violent jihadist movement Boko Haram. Even though the group has not built a constituency in Chadian society, there are undeniably Chadian nationals in Boko Haram’s ranks. After suffering a first attack at the beginning of 2015, Chad’s security apparatus must both prevent terrorist attacks in the capital and tackle a guerrilla-style insurgency in the Lake Chad area. Those living in the Lake Chad region are facing deadly Boko Haram suicide attacks and frequent raids, resulting in deaths and massive population displacements. Though military operations by the countries of the region have weakened the group, it remains a serious threat. Meanwhile, instability in Libya continues to be of great concern in N’Djamena. 

The government, fearing further attacks on Chadian soil including in N’Djamena, has adopted a series of measures to strengthen security, adapt the laws at its disposal to address the new threats and further police religious space. While many Chadians, especially in the capital, support these counter-terrorism policies, voices denouncing abuses by security forces during routine checks, as well as arbitrary arrests and summons, are growing louder. 

The country is also facing a major economic crisis due to both the regional spread of Boko Haram attacks, which have hindered trade with Nigeria and Cameroon, and the drop in oil price, particularly damaging given the economy’s strong dependence on oil revenue. As a result, the government has been forced to make budget cuts. Social discontent is growing as the election nears, and many issues have the potential to mobilise the population, including the cost of living, budgetary austerity, corruption and impunity. Protests have taken a more political hue with protesters denouncing President Déby’s candidacy for a fifth term. The political and social climate remains very tense and the state’s repression of demonstrations and harassment of civil society could aggravate it further. 

Finally, the government’s desire to police and control religious space, including banning the burqa and promoting a “Chadian” Sufi Islam, is widely supported but has also met some resistance. This resistance has revealed the strong antagonism between mainstream Sufi currents and fundamentalist minorities against a backdrop of a significant Wahhabi expansion, especially among the youth. While these intra-Muslim tensions are not an immediate threat, in the medium-term they could weaken the country’s social fabric. 

In the face of these accumulating challenges, Chadian authorities must avoid the politics of religious or geographic exclusion. The greatest threat to stability in Chad in the long-term is not Boko Haram – though the determined fight against the group must continue – but a national political crisis, which would create fertile ground for all sorts of violent actors, including jihadists. To avoid this, the Chadian state must open political space and build legitimate and sustainable institutions, capable of outlasting the current regime.

Nairobi/Brussels, 30 March 2016

Up Next

Tchad : le choix de Mahamat Déby

Originally published in Le Monde

Op-Ed / Africa

Tchad : le choix de Mahamat Déby

Originally published in Le Monde

Enrica Picco, d’International Crisis Group, appelle le président de transition à nommer une commission d’enquête indépendante pour faire la lumière sur la répression des manifestations du 20 octobre.

La journée sanglante du 20 octobre marque un tournant dans la transition tchadienne. Jusqu’à cette date, la junte militaire, qui a pris le pouvoir en avril 2021 à la mort d’Idriss Déby, avait respecté la feuille de route pour un retour à l’ordre constitutionnel. Les risques de déstabilisation du Tchad, après 30 ans de régime autoritaire, semblaient écartés. A la tête d’une transition militaire, Mahamat Déby, 38 ans et fils du président défunt, promettait une ouverture de l’espace public que les Tchadiens espéraient depuis longtemps. La tenue de négociations dès son accession au pouvoir avec les opposants historiques du régime de son père allait dans le sens de cette promesse. Mais la répression violente de la manifestation demandant, jeudi dernier, l’aboutissement de la transition a complètement changé la donne.

L’exception tchadienne

A la mort d’Idriss Déby, l’Union africaine n’a pas considéré la prise de pouvoir par une junte militaire comme un coup d’Etat, contrairement aux décisions qu’elle avait rendues ailleurs dans la région dans des situations similaires. L’organisation continentale a cependant imposé deux conditions aux militaires tchadiens : leur pouvoir devait se limiter à une période transitoire de dix-huit mois, renouvelable une seule fois, et les membres du gouvernement de transition ne pouvaient pas se présenter aux élections à venir. Ces conditions auraient dû permettre, au terme de la transition, une alternance de pouvoir à N’Djamena.

L’année 2022 a débuté avec deux évènements prometteurs : la tenue, à partir de mars, de négociations entre des représentants du gouvernement et de 52 groupes armés rebelles à Doha, au Qatar, puis des consultations à N’Djamena entre le Président Mahamat Déby et tous les représentants de la société civile et des partis d’opposition, y compris les plus réticents à négocier avec le pouvoir. Les pourparlers entamés avec l’opposition et avec les rebelles ont abouti à une même conclusion : leur participation aux étapes de la transition était conditionnée à la garantie claire que les militaires quitteraient le pouvoir à la fin de la transition.

Des frustrations politiques et sociales

Mais en l’absence de cette garantie, de nombreux partis et groupes armés ont refusé de participer au dialogue national. Les conclusions de ce dialogue, qui s’est tenu en leur absence entre le 20 août et le 8 octobre, a mis le feu aux poudres. Encore plus que l’extension de la transition, sur laquelle il y avait un certain consensus dans le pays, c’est le fait que les membres de la transition seront désormais éligibles aux élections qui a provoqué la colère les Tchadiens. La crainte d’une succession dynastique est devenue réelle. Le gouvernement d’unité nationale, mis rapidement en place le 14 octobre, avec des opposants acquis au régime depuis le dialogue, n’a pas apaisé cette colère.

La mauvaise gouvernance et les inégalités sociales ... sont devenues insupportables pour de nombreux Tchadiens.

De plus, les frustrations débordent de la sphère politique. La mauvaise gouvernance et les inégalités sociales, héritage de 30 ans de régime Déby, sont devenues insupportables pour de nombreux Tchadiens. Aux scandales de corruption qui impliquent l’élite au pouvoir s’ajoutent le manque d’opportunités pour les jeunes, les coupures d’électricité récurrentes et des inondations qui ont laissé près 350 000 personnes sans abri dans la capitale au mois d’août.

Ces tensions, politiques et sociales, ont abouti à la journée du jeudi 20 octobre. Le dirigeant du plus important parti de l’opposition Les Transformateurs, Succès Masra, a déclaré le 19 octobre avoir créé un « gouvernement du peuple pour la justice et l’égalité », alors que la plateforme de la société civile Wakit Tama a appelé à une mobilisation permanente contre le gouvernement de transition. A la veille des manifestations, le gouvernement a dénoncé une tentative d’insurrection armée et interdit les manifestations. Mais le lendemain, des milliers de Tchadiens sont descendus dans les rues et le régime a réagi très brutalement.

Les heurts entre police et manifestants ont été d’une rare violence. Les manifestants ont saccagé et incendié le siège du parti du Premier ministre, Saleh Kebzabo, les forces de l’ordre ont ouvert le feu de façon indiscriminée sur la foule. Le bilan officiel est très élevé, plus de 50 morts et 300 blessés, et ne cesse de s’alourdir à mesure que sont relayées les informations venant des provinces. Le même jour, le Premier ministre a annoncé un couvre-feu dans les principales villes et la suspension des activités des partis impliqués dans les manifestations. La situation reste extrêmement tendue dans l’ensemble du pays.  

Moment charnière pour Mahamat Déby

Pour éviter de nouvelles violences, toutes les parties prenantes devraient prendre des mesures urgentes. Le Président Déby devrait condamner l’usage excessif de la force et nommer une commission d’enquête indépendante pour faire la lumière sur les évènements du 20 octobre. Plutôt que de réprimer toujours plus durement la société civile et l’opposition, il devrait faire appel aux médiateurs nationaux et internationaux, comme le Groupe des religieux et des sages, l’Union africaine et le Qatar, en vue d’inclure les opposants dans la dernière phase de la transition. Il devrait surtout apaiser les tensions en reconsidérant l’éligibilité aux élections des membres de la transition et en s’engageant publiquement à transférer le pouvoir aux civils à la fin de la transition.

L’Union africaine, l’Union européenne, la France et les Etats-Unis, devrait conditionner leur soutien à la poursuite de la transition.

Pour leur part, les opposants devraient également condamner toute forme de protestation violente et utiliser tous les recours légaux prévus dans la charte de transition pour garantir des élections transparentes. Finalement, l’Union africaine, l’Union européenne, la France et les Etats-Unis, devrait conditionner leur soutien à la poursuite de la transition et à la mise en place de mesures qui garantissent l’inclusion et la représentativité.  

Les évènements du 20 octobre ont sérieusement entaché les espoirs de ceux qui considéraient le Tchad comme une exception parmi les tumultueuses transitions de la région. Mahamat Déby doit faire un choix. Il peut adopter le même régime brutal que celui de son père. Mais il est aussi encore temps pour lui de corriger cette inquiétante dérive autoritaire et de ramener le Tchad sur la voie d’une réelle transition vers un régime plus démocratique.

Subscribe to Crisis Group’s Email Updates

Receive the best source of conflict analysis right in your inbox.