icon caret Arrow Down Arrow Left Arrow Right Arrow Up Line Camera icon set icon set Ellipsis icon set Facebook Favorite Globe Hamburger List Mail Map Marker Map Microphone Minus PDF Play Print RSS Search Share Trash Crisiswatch Alerts and Trends Box - 1080/761 Copy Twitter Video Camera  copyview Whatsapp Youtube
Managing Mali’s elections: a short delay would pay long-term dividends
Managing Mali’s elections: a short delay would pay long-term dividends
Mali : défaire le coup d’Etat sans revenir en arrière
Mali : défaire le coup d’Etat sans revenir en arrière
Statement / Africa

Managing Mali’s elections: a short delay would pay long-term dividends

The recent agreement between the government and two rebel Tuareg groups is a positive step, but Mali’s politicians should now consider delaying presidential elections, the first round of which is currently scheduled for 28 July. This would allow authorities adequate time to prepare and ensure that those citizens who wish to vote can do so. The delay should be short – no more than three months – with timelines for outstanding tasks clearly defined. Pressing ahead within the existing timeline could lead to a chaotic and contested vote and a new president without the legitimacy essential for the country’s recovery. International partners should make it clear that setting the democratic bar too low is not a sustainable strategy, but rather one that would risk future instability the country can ill-afford.

In the last few days, interim President Dioncounda Traoré has received representatives from the main political parties to discuss the “Preliminary Agreement” his government signed last week in Ouagadougou with two principal armed groups in the north, the National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad and the High Council for the Unity of Azawad (known by their French acronyms MNLA and HCUA). The agreement should allow polls to be held across the country. It envisages the quick re-deployment of the Malian government and its security forces to Kidal, the northern-most region currently controlled by the Tuareg rebels but who have agreed to place their forces in a cantonment.

Exactly what the party representatives and president agreed during their consultations in Bamako is unclear, but they should now consider a short delay in presidential elections. Setting an ambitious date helped move along the Ouagadougou talks and accelerated steps toward elections. But despite the remarkable efforts of staff in the Ministry of the Territorial Administration – the entity responsible for organising elections – preparations for the vote still lag behind schedule. 

New ID cards have arrived in Bamako, and their delivery across the vast country will start soon, but deadlines are simply too tight for their distribution in all regions ahead of the polls. Experts fear that the majority of the 6.9 million registered voters would not receive their cards in time. They cannot vote without them, which could lead to frustration and possibly violence. Some of those that obtain cards may have moved since they registered and may lack time to request that their names be transferred, before voter lists are finalised. Prefects, the ministry staff overseeing elections in the districts, have barely returned to their offices in much of the north, further complicating preparations. Mali already has a troubled electoral history: in 2002 nearly one ballot out of four was cancelled; in 2007 some 40 per cent of voters did not receive their cards.

An election at the end of July, therefore, would likely be shambolic, with many eligible citizens protesting inability to cast ballots. The vote’s results would almost certainly be challenged. The leading candidates in the presidential election all believe today that they can win, even if the vote is disorderly – indeed some may feel they would benefit from a low turnout or one in which some regions have significantly higher participation than others. But in the aftermath of a flawed first round, losers would have plenty of ammunition to contest results. Little in Mali’s electoral history suggests the bodies responsible for resolving such disputes would be able to do so in a manner acceptable to all.

Specifically, a delay of no more than three months would give the Malian authorities time to:

  • complete the distribution of new ID cards to all registered voters;
  • re-deploy all district officers (prefects and sub-prefects) on a permanent basis and give them the necessary resources and time to restore security and prepare for the election;
  • extend the period for the internally displaced to provide their current location to the administrative committees in charge of establishing the final voter lists; and
  • complete special electoral lists for refugees in the camps in neighbouring countries and deter potential pressures and threats directed against them.

A short postponement would also give the national electoral commission (CENI), which has expressed reservations on the calendar, the necessary time to closely supervise the electoral process, its legally-mandated role. It would allow media and civil society organisations to better monitor the electoral campaign and preparations for the vote and play a key role in ensuring transparency – through accepted observation both at local voting stations and national tabulation centres – during the sensitive period of collation and publication of results, much as Senegalese civil society did during the 2012 presidential elections. Waiting until after the rainy season, which impedes movements and coincides with heavy farming activities, would also allow more voters in rural areas to cast their ballots. Finally, the Security Council confirmed only last Tuesday, 25 June, the deployment of the United Nations Stabilisation Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) as of 1 July, and a short postponement would give the mission enough time to:

  • provide the Malian authorities appropriate logistical and technical assistance and effective security arrangements as mandated by UN Security Council Resolution 2100; and
  • support the Malian authorities in anticipating sensitive immediate post-electoral challenges, including securing and conveying the polling stations’ official minutes; and deterring, or at least managing, any post-electoral violence.

The roots of Mali’s recent crisis run much deeper than flawed elections. Fixing its democracy, rebuilding its politics and military and reconciling its society will require more than a credible vote. But the presidential election is a vital first step, and it must be a step in the right direction. Mali’s politicians and international partners must do everything possible to prevent the problems of the past from resurfacing. Pressing ahead with the 28 July date would risk an election so technically deficient, and with such a low turnout, that it would fail to bestow sufficient legitimacy on the new president and could feed a new cycle of instability. Better a short delay for technical reasons – no more than what is strictly necessary and certainly no more than three months – that allows authorities to prepare properly and gives more Malians the opportunity to vote.

Dakar/Brussels

A crowd of people cheer Malian army soldiers at the Independence Square after a mutiny, in Bamako, Mali August 18, 2020. Picture taken August 18, 2020. REUTERS/Moussa Kalapo
Statement / Africa

Mali : défaire le coup d’Etat sans revenir en arrière

Le 18 août 2020 au Mali, un coup d’Etat militaire intervient après deux mois de manifestations contre le président Keïta. Les acteurs maliens et leurs partenaires doivent restaurer l’ordre constitutionnel, sans se contenter de rétablir le système et de remettre en place les personnalités renversées, qui ont largement contribué à générer la crise.

A la faveur d’un coup d’Etat ayant vu l’arrestation du président malien Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta et de son Premier ministre Boubou Cissé, les militaires ont pris le pouvoir au Mali le 18 août 2020. Ce coup est la dernière expression en date d’une crise politique majeure, marquée depuis début juin par de nombreuses manifestations qui réclament la démission du président Keïta. Les partenaires régionaux et internationaux de Bamako demandent, en toute légitimité, que l’ordre constitutionnel soit restauré. Ils doivent maintenir la pression sur les militaires afin que ceux-ci tiennent leur engagement de restituer le pouvoir aux civils dans les plus brefs délais. Mais un simple retour en arrière serait préjudiciable au pays. La crise politique dont souffrait le Mali, et la crise sécuritaire qui en découle, existaient avant le coup ; le mouvement de protestation reflète l’exaspération d’une grande partie de la population face à une démocratie et à une gouvernance défaillantes depuis de nombreuses années. Les Maliens et leurs partenaires devraient aussi saisir cette occasion pour s’assurer que le pays entame une véritable transition.

Le 18 août 2020, des tirs éclatent dans deux camps militaires situés respectivement au nord et au sud de Bamako, à Kati et N’Tominkorobougou. Un haut responsable de la garde nationale est arrêté par les mutins alors que des convois partent vers la capitale malienne. Presque au même moment, à Bamako, des hommes armés arrêtent de hauts responsables civils et militaires, tels que les ministres des Finances et de l’Intérieur, ou encerclent leur domicile. La situation est confuse, mais la simultanéité des évènements suggère qu’il ne s’agit pas d’une simple mutinerie et qu’une tentative de coup d’Etat est en cours. La situation évolue rapidement en fin d’après-midi ; des militaires s’emparent du Premier ministre Boubou Cissé et du président Keïta au domicile de ce dernier, sous les acclamations de ceux qui s’étaient réunis sur place.

Dans la nuit, le président Keïta, visiblement sous la contrainte, annonce sa démission ainsi que la dissolution de l’Assemblée nationale et du gouvernement. Quelques heures plus tard, un groupe de militaires parlant au nom du Comité national pour le salut du peuple (CNSP) prononce une courte allocution télévisée. Ils déclarent qu’ils assureront la gestion de l’Etat malien jusqu’à la tenue d’élections crédibles, qu’ils s’engagent à organiser dans les meilleurs délais, selon leurs propres termes. Les militaires auront ainsi pris les commandes du pays, presque sans effusion de sang, au terme d’un coup d’Etat qui aura duré moins de 24 heures.

Dès le 19 août, les dirigeants du Mouvement du 5 juin-Rassemblement des Forces patriotiques (M5-RFP), qui anime la contestation populaire contre le président Keïta depuis début juin, se félicitent de sa démission et des dissolutions du gouvernement et de l’Assemblée nationale. Ils se disent prêts à participer à une transition républicaine et à l’élaboration d’une feuille de route, en collaboration avec le CNSP. Il est trop tôt pour savoir si le mouvement de contestation et les responsables de la junte trouveront les moyens de s’entendre durablement. Mais le M5-RFP cherchera sans doute à faire en sorte que les militaires ne récoltent pas tous les bénéfices d’un changement de pouvoir dans lequel le mouvement a joué un rôle central pendant les longues semaines de mobilisation et de protestation.

On ne sait que peu de choses sur le groupe de militaires à l’origine du coup d’Etat. Contrairement à ceux qui avaient fomenté celui de mars 2012, il semble que les chefs de la junte qui a pris le pouvoir à Bamako soient tous des officiers de haut rang issus des différents corps des forces de défense et de sécurité maliennes. Le 19 août 2020, les colonels Assimi Goita, commandant du bataillon autonome des forces spéciales, et Malick Diaw, chef adjoint du camp militaire de Kati, sont nommés respectivement président et vice-président du CNSP. Comme d’autres membres du comité, ils ont servi au Nord du pays pendant la crise de 2012. Ils justifient leur action par l’état de délabrement du pays, dont ils rendent responsable le président déchu, et appellent la société civile et les mouvements sociopolitiques à les rejoindre pour constituer une « transition politique civile » et s’accorder sur une feuille de route qui jettera les bases de la reconstruction du pays. Ils demandent également aux organisations sous-régionales et internationales de les soutenir. Enfin, ils déclarent qu’ils souhaitent voir appliquer l’accord de paix signé en juin 2015 avec les mouvements politico-militaires du Nord du pays et – cherchant sans doute à rassurer les forces militaires internationales présentes au Mali – affirment qu’ils demeurent engagés à leurs côtés.

Ces évènements surviennent dans un contexte politique tendu. Depuis le mois de juin, des manifestations régulières réclamant le départ du président sont organisées par le M5-RFP, une organisation hétéroclite composée de groupes et de personnalités religieuses, politiques et de la société civile. Le 10 juillet, ces manifestations jusque-là pacifiques et prônant la désobéissance civile dégénèrent en violences mortelles et poussent la Communauté économique des Etats d’Afrique de l’Ouest (Cedeao) – organisation régionale regroupant quinze Etats d’Afrique de l’Ouest qui s’est dotée en 2001 d’un protocole sur la démocratie et la bonne gouvernance – à intensifier une médiation initiée en juin.

Les évènements du 18 août semblent ramener le Mali au point de départ de la crise de mars 2012.

Cette crise politique a éclaté à la suite des élections législatives de mars et avril 2020, et plus particulièrement après une décision controversée de la Cour constitutionnelle ; celle-ci a invalidé les résultats de plusieurs centaines de bureaux de vote, modifiant ainsi l’at­tri­bu­tion de 31 sièges de députés sur un total de 147. Pourtant, loin d’exprimer un simple contentieux post-électoral, cette crise apparait comme le fruit d’un mécontentement profond et récurrent face à un Etat malien dysfonctionnel, corrompu et incapable de relever la multitude de défis auxquels est confronté ce pays parmi les plus pauvres au monde. Les graves tensions sécuritaires qui secouent le pays, marquées par la présence de mouvements armés autonomistes, d’insurgés jihadistes et de groupes d’autodéfense à base communautaire, ne sont en réalité que le symptôme d’une crise qui touche le cœur de la démocratie malienne.

Affaibli et discrédité par des années de gouvernance défaillante, le gouvernement malien a longtemps vacillé avant d’être finalement renversé, sur fond d’élections organisées dans des conditions sécuritaires peu propices à la transparence. Ces dernières années, il a périodiquement organisé de grands moments de concertation nationale, et promis publiquement d’améliorer la gouvernance. Mais ses promesses ont rarement été suivies d’effet et sonnaient comme autant d’occasions manquées par l’élite dirigeante. Même face à l’intensification de la pression de la rue ces dernières semaines, le président n’a pas saisi la profondeur du mécontentement et a au contraire avancé des concessions qui, une fois de plus, se sont révélées insuffisantes.

Dès le 18 août, la communauté internationale (Cedeao, ONU, Union africaine, Union européenne, France et Etats-Unis) condamne unanimement la prise de pouvoir par les militaires maliens et demande le rétablissement de l’ordre constitutionnel ainsi que la libération du président, du Premier ministre et des autres personnalités politiques arrêtées. La Cedeao suspend le Mali de tous les organes de décision de l’organisation régionale et appelle ses membres à fermer leurs frontières et à arrêter tous les flux et transactions économiques avec le Mali. Le Conseil de paix et de sécurité de l’Union africaine suspend également le Mali de l’UA jusqu’au retour de l’ordre constitutionnel. La question de savoir si Keïta doit reprendre ses fonctions ou si le rétablissement de l’ordre constitutionnel peut prendre d’autres formes divise les partenaires internationaux. Certains, comme la France, ont pris acte de l’annonce de la démission du président et appelé au rétablissement sans délai d’une autorité civile. Le 20 août, la Cedeao a, de son côté, appelé au rétablissement du président Keïta dans ses fonctions et demandé des sanctions contre la junte.

Les principaux partenaires du Mali ont raison d’exiger le respect des principes démocratiques et le rétablissement de l’ordre constitutionnel. Ils doivent maintenir la pression sur les officiers pour que ces derniers assurent un retour à un pouvoir civil transparent dans les plus brefs délais et qu’ils libèrent les personnalités en détention. Mais il serait risqué de se focaliser uniquement sur la restauration du pouvoir et des personnalités renversées, dont le rejet par une large frange de la population est à l’origine de la crise. Si la communauté internationale impose le rétablissement du président, cela pourrait susciter d’importants mouvements de résistance non seulement de la part de militaires solidement armés mais aussi des mouvements de la société civile qui se sont mobilisés dans la rue pour réclamer son départ.

Avant toute autre chose, le pays a besoin d’une gouvernance favorable à de réelles réformes, en particulier l’assainissement des finances publiques et le redéploiement effectif des services de l’Etat sur l’ensemble du territoire. En d’autres termes, les Maliens et leurs partenaires pourraient aussi faire de cette inadmissible prise de pouvoir militaire une occasion de tourner la page sur un statu quo qui a plongé le pays dans une profonde crise politico-sécuritaire.

Une période de transition est sans doute inévitable, mais elle doit être la plus courte possible. Les militaires devraient tenir leur engagement de rendre le pouvoir aux civils d’ici quelques jours, ou semaines tout au plus. Plusieurs options existent. Le Mali pourrait s’inspirer de l’exemple de son voisin, le Burkina Faso, où, après le départ forcé du président Compaoré en 2014, la transition a permis de renouer avec l’ordre constitutionnel et une forme de stabilité politique (même si des incidents graves, dont une tentative de coup d’Etat, ont ponctué cette période). L’armée a transféré le pouvoir aux civils en moins d’un mois par le biais d’une charte nationale de transition, rédigée avec les forces politiques et les principales organisations de la société civile. Celle-ci a mis en place un système dans lequel un président civil est choisi en dehors de la classe politique par un collège de désignation composé de civils et de militaires, et présidé par un représentant religieux. Le président a ensuite nommé un Premier ministre et son gouvernement. La charte a également instauré un conseil national de transition faisant office d’assemblée législative et composé de membres issus des principales forces politiques et de la société civile.

Dans le cas malien, les membres du conseil national de transition pourraient émaner des rangs de l’opposition étendue au M5-RFP, de l’ancienne majorité et des représentants de la société civile. Chaque composante créerait son groupe selon un quota déterminé dans la charte. Ce conseil national pourrait rédiger une feuille de route visant à guider l’action du gouvernement et dont le but premier serait d’amorcer une véritable réforme de la gouvernance et un assainissement des finances publiques, sans doute à travers un audit général. Le gouvernement de transition devra préparer des élections auxquelles ses membres ne sauraient être candidats eux-mêmes.

La Cedeao pourrait profiter de la visite qu’elle prévoit d’effectuer à Bamako dans les jours à venir pour suggérer un scénario de cet ordre au CNSP et aux autres forces politiques maliennes. Si la transition s’opère, la Cedeao, avec le soutien de l’Union africaine, pourrait aussi être invitée par les autorités de transition à veiller à ce que l’ordre constitutionnel soit effectivement rétabli, notamment via l’organisation d’élections.

Les évènements du 18 août semblent ramener le Mali au point de départ de la crise de mars 2012. A l’époque, des militaires avaient renversé le président Touré, ouvrant une période de troubles politiques alors qu’une crise sécuritaire secouait le Nord du pays. La leçon est sans appel : les huit ans qui se sont écoulés depuis ont largement étés gaspillés, et le surplace politique s’est révélé coûteux. En privilégiant la sécurité sur la gouvernance, les partenaires du Mali ont négligé le fait qu’un Etat compétent et pourvoyeur de services est un fondement indispensable de la stabilité du pays et de la région. Sans nul doute, le chantier de la gouvernance est plus laborieux et plus long. Mais les évènements du 18 août sonnent comme un rappel : il s’agit également du chantier le plus important pour apporter une réponse durable aux défis politiques et sécuritaires auxquels le pays est confronté.