icon caret Arrow Down Arrow Left Arrow Right Arrow Up Line Camera icon set icon set Ellipsis icon set Facebook Favorite Globe Hamburger List Mail Map Marker Map Microphone Minus PDF Play Print RSS Search Share Trash Crisiswatch Alerts and Trends Box - 1080/761 Copy Twitter Video Camera  copyview Youtube
Curbing Violence in Nigeria (II): The Boko Haram Insurgency
Curbing Violence in Nigeria (II): The Boko Haram Insurgency
Table of Contents
  1. Executive Summary
Grossesses et mariages précoces : la face cachée de la guerre contre Boko Haram au Cameroun
Grossesses et mariages précoces : la face cachée de la guerre contre Boko Haram au Cameroun
Report 216 / Africa

Curbing Violence in Nigeria (II): The Boko Haram Insurgency

In an environment of poverty, injustice and lack of political will for reform, Boko Haram is increasingly putting local and regional stability at risk.

Executive Summary

Boko Haram’s four-year-old insurgency has pitted neighbour against neighbour, cost more than 4,000 lives, displaced close to half a million, destroyed hundreds of schools and government buildings and devastated an already ravaged economy in the North East, one of Nigeria’s poorest regions. It overstretches federal security services, with no end in sight, spills over to other parts of the north and risks reaching Niger and Cameroon, weak countries poorly equipped to combat a radical Islamist armed group tapping into real governance, corruption, impunity and underdevelopment grievances shared by most people in the region. Boko Haram is both a serious challenge and manifestation of more profound threats to Nigeria’s security. Unless the federal and state governments, and the region, develop and implement comprehensive plans to tackle not only insecurity but also the injustices that drive much of the troubles, Boko Haram, or groups like it, will continue to destabilise large parts of the country. Yet, the government’s response is largely military, and political will to do more than that appears entirely lacking.

Most Nigerians are poorer today than they were at independence in 1960, victims of the resource curse and rampant, entrenched corruption. Agriculture, once the economy’s mainstay is struggling. In many parts of the country, the government is unable to provide security, good roads, water, health, reliable power and education. The situation is particularly dire in the far north. Frustration and alienation drive many to join “self-help” ethnic, religious, community or civic groups, some of which are hostile to the state.

It is in this environment that the group called Boko Haram (usually translated loosely as “Western education is forbidden”) by outsiders emerged. It is an Islamic sect that believes corrupt, false Muslims control northern Nigeria. The group and fellow travellers want to remedy this by establishing an Islamic state in the north with strict adherence to Sharia (Islamic law).

Boko Haram’s early leader, the charismatic preacher Mohammed Yusuf, tried to do so non-violently. While accounts are disputed, the narrative put forward by Boko Haram and now dominant in the region is that around 2002, Yusuf was co-opted by the then Borno state gubernatorial candidate, Ali Modu Sheriff, for the support of his large youth movement, in exchange for full implementation of Sharia and promises of senior state government positions for his followers in the event of an electoral victory. Sheriff denies any such arrangement or involvement with the sect. As the group rose to greater prominence, the state religious commissioner was accused of providing resources to Yusuf, while the government never implemented full Sharia.

Yusuf subsequently became increasingly critical of the government and official corruption, his popularity soared, and the group expanded into other states, including Bauchi, Yobe and Kano. “After the politicians created the monster”, a senior security officer commented, “they lost control of it”. The State Security Services (SSS) arrested and interrogated Yusuf a number of times, but he was never prosecuted, reportedly because of the intervention of influential officials. He also was said to receive funds from external Salafi contacts, including Osama bin Laden, that he used to fund a micro-credit scheme for his followers and give welfare, food and shelter to refugees and unemployed youth.

A series of clashes between Boko Haram members and police escalated into an armed insurrection in 2009. Troops crushed the rebellion, killing hundreds of followers and destroying the group’s principal mosque. Yusuf was captured, handed over to the police and shortly thereafter extrajudicially executed. 

Boko Haram went underground and a year later launched attacks on police officers, police stations and military barracks, explicitly in revenge for the killings of Yusuf and his comrades. Its spokesman demanded prosecution of those responsible, release of their detained colleagues, restoration of the mosque and compensation for sect members killed by troops. Since 2010, the group’s campaign has grown, targeting not only security forces, government officials and politicians, but also Christians, critical Muslim clerics, traditional leaders, the UN presence, bars and schools. Lately it has evolved into pure terrorism, with targeting of students attending secular state schools, health workers involved in polio vaccination campaigns and villages supporting the government.

In May 2013, President Goodluck Jonathan declared an emergency in Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states and deployed additional troops that with the help of vigilantes drove Boko Haram from most cities and towns. He also established a committee to negotiate a settlement with its leadership, with little success. On 18 March 2014, National Security Advisor Mohammed Sambo Dasuki announced a “soft” approach to addressing the root causes of terrorism, but it remains to be seen whether and how it will be implemented.

The movement, never very hierarchical, is more dispersed than ever, with many leaders in the Adamawa mountains, Cameroon, and Niger. Its isolated leader, the violent Abubakar Shekau, probably has little daily control over cells, and it is fragmenting into factions, including the relatively sophisticated Ansaru, which focuses more on foreign targets. Able to move fairly freely, these groups are unlikely ever to be completely suppressed, unless the government wins local hearts and minds by implementing fundamental political reforms to address bad governance, corruption and underdevelopment. Insecurity in much of the north may also worsen political violence and undermine the credibility of the 2015 elections, further damaging government legitimacy.

Op-Ed / Africa

Grossesses et mariages précoces : la face cachée de la guerre contre Boko Haram au Cameroun

Originally published in Le Monde

Dans la région camerounaise de l’Extrême-Nord, les forces de défense et de sécurité affrontent depuis 2014 le mouvement djihadiste Boko Haram, apparu au Nigeria. Au moins 1 900 civils et 200 militaires ont été tués par Boko Haram, et l’Extrême-Nord compte aujourd’hui 240 000 déplacés internes. Mais ce sinistre état des lieux ne dit rien des problèmes sociaux liés au conflit, en particulier des grossesses adolescentes, des mariages d’enfants et de la situation des enfants victimes de Boko Haram.

A l’occasion de travaux de recherche à Maroua, Mokolo, Mora et Kousseri, en février et mars, portant sur les comités de vigilance et les combattants de Boko Haram qui se sont rendus, International Crisis Group (ICG) a pu approfondir son analyse de ces aspects généralement méconnus du conflit, auxquels le gouvernement camerounais comme les donateurs internationaux devraient porter une plus grande attention.

Des militaires en position de force

Avant le conflit, l’Extrême-Nord était déjà l’une des régions comptant le pourcentage le plus élevé de grossesses adolescentes et de mariages d’enfants. Selon le Fonds des Nations unies pour la population (Fnuap), en 2011, parmi les jeunes filles âgées de 20 à 24 ans, 12,5 % avaient eu un premier enfant avant l’âge de 15 ans (contre 6,4 % à l’échelle nationale) et 47,2 % avant 18 ans (contre 29,9 %).

S’agissant des mariages d’enfants, selon le Fonds des Nations unies pour l’enfance (Unicef), en 2013, 31,9 % des jeunes filles de l’Extrême-Nord étaient mariées avant l’âge de 15 ans (contre 13,4 % à l’échelle nationale) et 67,7 % avant 18 ans (contre 38,4 %). Depuis 2014, ces deux tendances s’accentuent dans la région alors qu’elles reculent dans le reste du pays.

En raison du conflit, les militaires sont parfois les seuls jeunes hommes présents dans certaines localités, ceux originaires de la zone ayant rejoint Boko Haram, ayant été tués ou étant partis pour gagner leur vie, se mettre en sécurité ou échapper aux recrutements forcés de Boko Haram et aux soupçons des forces de sécurité. Disposant du pouvoir et de ressources financières dans un contexte de forte précarité, les militaires sont en position de force vis-à-vis des jeunes filles. Dès lors, il n’est pas toujours aisé de déterminer si les relations sexuelles sont consenties. Mais des cas de viol sont avérés.

Dans le climat qui a prévalu de 2014 à 2017, entre suspicions et délations, certaines jeunes filles ont cherché des partenaires militaires pour protéger leurs familles. Des soldats ont par ailleurs imposé des relations sexuelles à des jeunes filles en les menaçant d’accuser des membres de leur famille d’appartenir à Boko Haram. Ces jeunes filles de l’Extrême-Nord ne sont évidemment pas tombées enceintes que de militaires, mais aussi de civils, voire de membres de Boko Haram.

Dans le village de Salack, où se situe le quartier général pour la région du Bataillon d’intervention rapide, 263 grossesses adolescentes ont été recensées en 2017, selon une étude de la Mission catholique qui n’a pas été rendue publique. Ce serait trois fois plus qu’avant le conflit. Le pourcentage de mariages d’enfants augmente aussi, car la précarité et la raréfaction des ressources sont telles que de nombreuses familles poussent leurs jeunes filles à se marier le plus tôt possible. D’autres jeunes femmes se prostituent.

Plus généralement, il faut s’interroger sur les nouvelles formes de parentalité et leurs conséquences dans la région. Ainsi, les familles monoparentales et les femmes chefs de ménages sont désormais nombreuses dans certaines localités, ainsi que parmi les communautés de déplacés, car les hommes ont souvent été plus ciblés que les femmes lors des attaques de Boko Haram.

Enfants soldats, orphelins et blessés

Le conflit avec Boko Haram a touché les enfants de diverses manières. L’Extrême-Nord compte aujourd’hui des milliers d’enfants soldats, d’orphelins ou d’enfants blessés dans des attentats perpétrés par le mouvement djihadiste. Mais peu de moyens sont alloués à leur prise en charge, qui n’est pas une priorité des pouvoirs publics et des ONG. Ainsi, l’Institution camerounaise de l’enfance (ICE) manque cruellement de moyens et de soutiens. Depuis 2015, cet organisme basé à Maroua et rattaché au ministère des affaires sociales est l’une des rares structures à suivre des enfants victimes de Boko Haram ainsi que des mineurs détenus en raison de leurs liens avec le mouvement.

Parmi les enfants pris en charge par l’ICE, ceux ayant appartenu ou collaboré avec Boko Haram sont pour la plupart des jeunes garçons et venant des villes frontalières les plus touchées par le conflit que sont Kolofata, Banki, Amchidé, Fotokol et Goulfey. Ils sont très majoritairement camerounais. Leur âge varie de 4 et 18 ans, mais la plupart ont entre 13 et 16 ans. Au sein de Boko Haram, la plupart étaient chargés de diverses corvées (puiser de l’eau, cultiver la terre, porter des messages et acheter des choses), mais certains officiaient comme guetteurs ou espions. Un tiers d’entre eux étaient des combattants. Certains ont suivi leurs parents quand ces derniers ont rejoint Boko Haram, d’autres ont été enlevés.

Le Cameroun fait face dans l’Extrême-Nord à l’un des défis sécuritaires les plus importants de sa jeune histoire.

La plupart des enfants ont été amenés à l’ICE par l’armée. Certains présentaient des signes de « radicalisation », selon les responsables de l’institution : ils refusaient de serrer la main des femmes ou de jouer avec des non-musulmans. Pour les « déradicaliser », l’ICE a fait appel à un imam et associé dialogues éducatifs, activités de groupe et animations socioculturelles. Les pensionnaires sont pris en charge dans l’enceinte de l’ICE et le site n’est pas clos. Selon le directeur, « la clôture est psychologique. Les enfants sortent et reviennent, ils ne vont pas loin. Un imam intervient chaque semaine pour des entretiens individuels et collectifs avec ceux qui sont radicalisés. Nous leur offrons aussi des jeux de rôle, des sketchs, des jeux de société et nous observons leurs attitudes ».

Les pensionnaires de l’ICE restent en moyenne un an, voire deux pour quelques-uns, surtout des Nigérians, Nigériens, Tchadiens et Centrafricains, en raison des difficultés à identifier leurs parents. En trois ans, l’ICE est parvenu à réinsérer 275 enfants enrôlés comme membres ou collaborateurs de Boko Haram dans leur famille d’origine. En mars, seuls douze enfants étaient encore pensionnaires à l’ICE, leurs familles n’ayant pu être identifiées. L’un des enfants recueillis par l’institution, un ex-combattant surnommé « Général » et décrit par les responsables de l’ICE comme « radicalisé », s’est échappé en août 2017.

Petite délinquance et criminalité

Avec seulement cinq employés et un budget annuel de moins de 100 millions de francs CFA (moins de 150 000 euros), l’ICE a des ressources très limitées, d’autant qu’elle s’occupe aussi de la réinsertion dans des familles de mineurs libérés de la prison de Maroua. Aucun psychologue professionnel ne suit les pensionnaires, et le personnel de l’ICE doit de facto assumer ce rôle. Ainsi, en lieu et place d’un programme de scolarisation, l’ICE a initié un programme d’alphabétisation. Selon le directeur, « certains enfants parviennent à dire des phrases en français après un an », ce qui représente un progrès dans cette région, la plus pauvre du Cameroun et celle où le taux de scolarisation est le plus faible.

Occasionnellement, l’ICE obtient un soutien du Comité international de la Croix-Rouge, du Fnuap, du Haut Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) et d’associations locales comme l’Association pour la protection des enfants éloignés de leurs familles (Apeef). Mais ces soutiens sont plutôt modestes et se limitent parfois à des formations pour son personnel.

A cause de ce manque de moyens, l’ICE a récemment renoncé à prendre à charge des enfants enlevés par Boko Haram ou nés en captivité qui faisaient partie d’un groupe de 410 anciens captifs arrivés dans le département du Mayo-Tsanaga en 2017. Par ailleurs, certains des mineurs réinsérés dans leurs familles retombent dans la petite délinquance et la criminalité, car les réinsertions ne s’accompagnent pas d’un véritable suivi ou d’une aide matérielle pour favoriser la scolarisation et l’insertion économique des anciens pensionnaires.

Pour leur réinsertion économique, les pensionnaires privilégient les métiers de la menuiserie, de la mécanique et de la couture, qu’ils pratiquaient parfois déjà au sein de Boko Haram. Ces métiers se trouvent aussi être les plus prisés par les anciens membres combattants adultes de Boko Haram. Ils sont réticents à opter pour le commerce, car les échanges commerciaux avec le Nigeria – principal débouché des produits de l’Extrême-Nord – restent fortement perturbés.

Ouvrir une enquête sur les cas de viols

Le Cameroun fait face dans l’Extrême-Nord à l’un des défis sécuritaires les plus importants de sa jeune histoire. Les difficultés économiques persistantes et même les questions du développement et de la réforme de la gouvernance locale ne doivent pas masquer des problèmes sociaux importants qui découlent du conflit avec Boko Haram.

Le gouvernement et les donateurs prennent actuellement conscience de la nécessité de financer la démobilisation et la réinsertion des membres de Boko Haram ainsi que d’une partie des membres des comités de vigilance, car cela permettrait d’accélérer les redditions des combattants camerounais et d’empêcher un possible basculement de certains comités de vigilance dans le banditisme et divers réseaux criminels après le conflit.

Dans la même perspective, ils devraient renforcer leur aide à la réinsertion socio-éducative et économique des enfants victimes de Boko Haram, dans le cadre d’une politique cohérente, et leur soutien aux familles monoparentales. Le ministère de la défense devrait également ouvrir une enquête sur tous les cas de viols ou abus sur mineurs commis par les militaires et sanctionner les auteurs le cas échéant. Il devrait enfin incorporer au règlement intérieur de l’armée et de la police des dispositions encadrant les relations sexuelles entre forces de sécurité et populations dans les zones de conflit.