icon caret Arrow Down Arrow Left Arrow Right Arrow Up Line Camera icon set icon set Ellipsis icon set Facebook Favorite Globe Hamburger List Mail Map Marker Map Microphone Minus PDF Play Print RSS Search Share Trash Crisiswatch Alerts and Trends Box - 1080/761 Copy Twitter Video Camera  copyview Whatsapp Youtube
« Au Niger, l’option militaire face à l’Etat islamique doit s’accompagner d’un projet politique »
« Au Niger, l’option militaire face à l’Etat islamique doit s’accompagner d’un projet politique »
Sri Lanka's President Maithripala Sirisena (front) stands for the national anthem during a ceremony to swear in Ranil Wickremesinghe, leader of the United National Party, as Sri Lanka's new prime minister, Colombo, 21 August 2015. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawat
Report 278 / Asia

Sri Lanka: Jumpstarting the Reform Process

Seven years after its civil war ended, Sri Lanka’s democratic space has reopened but strains are building from a powerful opposition, institutional overlaps and a weakened economy. To make reforms a real success, the prime minister and president should cooperate with openness and redouble efforts to tackle legacies of war like impunity, Tamil detainees and military-occupied land.

Executive Summary

The unexpected chance for lasting peace and reconciliation in Sri Lanka that followed President Maithripala Sirisena’s January 2015 election faces increasing turbulence. Initial moves by Sirisena’s government halted and began to reverse the slide into authoritarianism and family rule under Mahinda Rajapaksa. Its reform agenda is ambitious: restoring the rule-of-law and ending impunity for corruption and abuse of power; a new constitution; a complex package of post-war reconciliation and justice mechanisms agreed with the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC); and major policy changes to jump-start a beleaguered economy. Progress, however, has been slower than key constituencies expected and lacks the coherence and resources needed to sustain it. The “national unity” government expanded the political centre and isolated hard-line nationalists, but the window for change has begun to close. Seizing Sri Lanka’s unprecedented opportunity for reform requires bolder and better coordinated policies, backed by a public relations campaign to restore sagging popular support.

The stuttering progress strains ties between the government and the constituencies that brought it to power. Tamils in the north and east voted overwhelmingly for Sirisena but are increasingly doubtful he will fulfil his reconciliation and justice promises. Many Sinhala “good governance” activists criticise the failure to follow through on rule-of-law measures, continued cases of alleged nepotism and corruption and what they consider the lethargic pursuit of corruption and criminal investigations. As the budget deficit grows and currency reserves dwindle, belt-tightening has been blocked or scaled back due to protests. At the same time, strains are growing between Sirisena’s Sri Lanka Freedom Party (SLFP) and the United National Party (UNP) of Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe. The small window for threading the political needles essential for reforms is shrinking. 

Institutional factors hamper progress: too few staff and too little expertise, particularly on reconciliation and transitional justice issues, multiple power centres and unwieldy, often overlapping ministries, and the different priorities and governance styles of president and prime minister. Governance reforms are slowed by need to work through bureaucrats and politicians implicated in past abuses, some of whom were given cabinet posts to help the government achieve the two-thirds parliamentary majority needed to approve a new constitution.

Boldness is limited by Sirisena’s struggle to counter the faction loyal to ex-President Rajapaksa within his SLFP, especially in upcoming local elections. Reacting defensively to Sinhala nationalists’ attacks against Sirisena’s relatively modest reconciliation gestures and proposed constitutional reform and scared of giving opponents ammunition or angering the military and security services, the government has returned only a small portion of military-occupied land and released few Tamil detainees. 

Seven years after the end of the civil war in May 2009, issues of reconciliation and accountability remain largely unaddressed. The government appears to be backtracking on transitional justice plans, particularly the role of foreign judges and experts. The enormity of the crimes, especially in the final weeks of the war, makes them impossible to ignore but hard for the military and most Sinhalese to acknowledge or accept responsibility for. Mechanisms promised to the UNHRC feed Sinhala nationalist suspicions, while attempts to reassure Sinhalese and the military encourage doubts among Tamils about government willingness to pursue justice for wartime atrocities or back constitutional changes that satisfy legitimate Tamil aspirations for meaningful autonomy. 

To hold its coalition together and meet UNHRC obligations, the government must sequence reforms carefully, speeding progress on some fronts to rebuild public confidence, while committing resources to build support and institutional capacity for deeper and harder steps, particularly making progress on the critically important special court for prosecuting war crimes. Better communication and cooperation between president and prime minister, more transparent policymaking and clearer lines of authority are essential.

To rebuild confidence among Tamil communities in the north and east, the government must quickly release detainees and military-occupied land, begin credible inquiries into the fate of the disappeared, investigate and end abuses and repeal the Prevention of Terrorism Act (PTA). For these and other reforms to be sustainable, the president and prime minister will have to assert authority over the military and national security apparatus, including by developing a credible security sector reform plan. If they are serious about constitutional changes that will contribute to a lasting solution to the ethnic conflict, Sirisena and key ministers must make a much stronger public case for greater devolution of power.

Ending impunity and restoring rule-of-law are concern to the whole country, as seen in the popularity of good governance and anti-corruption citizen movements in the Sinhala south. To resonate more broadly with all ethnic groups and regions, measures for addressing the war’s legacy should be presented by the government and civil society as an integral part of the rule-of-law and good governance agenda. Moves to prosecute key cases of corruption and political killing under the Rajapaksa regime need to be backed by a sustained public relations campaign that articulates a broad vision of a reformed state, the links between the various initiatives and the benefits they bring all communities. 

As longstanding dysfunctional political dynamics reassert themselves, the government’s ability to distinguish itself from the Rajapaksa era, which is essential to its political survival, has begun to fade. If ethnic and religious chauvinists in all communities are not to grow stronger and belief in democratic reform that Sirisena’s election reflected and encouraged is to be rekindled, the government must make a concerted push to jump-start the flagging reform process.

Recommendations

To strengthen rule-of-law and democratic governance 

To the government of Sri Lanka: 

  1. Ratify the UN Disappearances Convention and pass enabling legislation criminalising disappearances; terminate the Paranagama commission on missing persons and transfer its investigation files to dedicated police investigation units. 
     
  2. Pass the pending Right to Information (RTI) Act and legislation to establish a well-resourced and empowered Audit Commission. 
     
  3. Repeal the Prevention of Terrorism Act (PTA) and replace it, in consultation with lawyers and human rights defenders, with legislation in line with Sri Lanka’s international human rights obligations; and develop and publish guidelines for expediting cases against existing PTA detainees and releasing those against whom there is insufficient evidence to bring charges.
     
  4. Overhaul the Victims and Witness Protection Act, in consultation with human rights activists, to establish a well-resourced witness protection authority fully independent of police and security forces.
     
  5. End the longstanding conflict of interest in the Attorney General’s Department by establishing a permanent, independent special prosecutor for serious human rights cases in which state officials are alleged perpetrators. 
     
  6. Establish a clear focal point in the Attorney General’s Department, staffed by state counsels vetted for conflict of interest or involvement in past cover-ups, to oversee and prosecute emblematic cases of political killings and abduction currently under investigation.

To promote reconciliation, reestablish effective civil administration in the north and east and begin security sector reform

To the government of Sri Lanka: 

  1. Take immediate steps to end remaining military involvement in civil administration; remove the military from all shops, farms, hotels and other commercial businesses; and immediately suspend construction or expansion of military camps in the north and east.
     
  2. Establish, in consultation with communities and the military, transparent principles, processes and timetables for the return of military-occupied land or payment of compensation for land that is not to be returned. 
     
  3. End intimidating monitoring of civil society activists and ex-detainees by security services and appoint an independent, multi-ethnic, well-resourced internal affairs unit to investigate credible allegations of arbitrary detentions, abductions and torture in custody.
     
  4. Begin developing a longer-term plan for comprehensive security sector reform that includes job training for demobilised personnel; and devise and implement in the short term policies for handling individuals credibly alleged to be responsible for serious violations of human rights and humanitarian law.  

To support constitutional reform needed for lasting political stability

To the government of Sri Lanka:

  1. Launch a public outreach campaign, led by the president and prime minster, in support of expanded devolution of power to provinces.
     
  2. Support a mixed electoral system that maintains proportionality and the influence of smaller, regionally-dispersed parties through use of double-ballots.

To address the complex demands of transitional justice processes

To the government of Sri Lanka: 

  1. Reaffirm publicly the government’s commitment to full implementation of the 1 October 2015 UN Human Rights Council resolution and take initial steps to build capacity and public support for effective transitional justice, by:
     
    1. launching a coordinated public outreach campaign – involving the offices of the president and prime minister, the Reconciliation Secretariat (SCRM), National Unity Office (ONUR) and national dialogue ministry – to promote the value of transitional justice mechanisms and highlight links to broader rule-of-law measures, beginning with immediate distribution of the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) Investigation on Sri Lanka (OISL) report in all three languages once Tamil and Sinhala translations are available;
       
    2. giving the public consultation process adequate resources and endorsement and presenting draft legislative proposals to it for popular input, with a transparent timeframe for final submission to the parliament; 
       
    3. publishing draft legislation for the Missing Persons Office and inviting active input from families of the missing and disappeared and other stakeholders;
       
    4. establishing a timeline for training judges, lawyers and investigators for participation in the special war crimes court and for passing legislation establishing command responsibility as a mode of criminal liability and incorporating war crimes and crimes against humanity into national law; and
       
    5. requesting the OHCHR to recommend international prosecutors and judges for participation in the special court as committed to in the resolution. 

Colombo/Brussels, 18 May 2016

Op-Ed / Africa

« Au Niger, l’option militaire face à l’Etat islamique doit s’accompagner d’un projet politique »

Originally published in Le Monde

L’analyste Hannah Armstrong regrette que Niamey délaisse le dialogue avec les communautés frontalières de la région de Tillabéri, notamment les nomades peuls.

Le Niger est depuis des années l’Etat du Sahel central le plus résilient face aux insurrections menées par l’Etat islamique (EI) et Al-Qaïda. Cela n’a pas empêché les forces nigériennes de subir les attaques les plus meurtrières de leur histoire en décembre et janvier derniers. Ces deux attaques, qui ont fait plus de 150 morts, ont mis en lumière la manière dont la branche sahélienne de l’EI, particulièrement active entre le Mali et la région nigérienne de Tillabéri, s’est renforcée en exploitant le fossé grandissant entre le gouvernement et les communautés locales. Elles ont également amorcé un brusque changement de cap : l’Etat nigérien privilégie de nouveau le volet militaire, délaissant la politique de dialogue avec les communautés frontalières de la région de Tillabéri initiée mi-2018 afin de regagner leur confiance.

Quelques jours après la seconde attaque, les dirigeants des pays membres du G5 Sahel et de la France, réunis en sommet à Pau le 13 janvier, ont d’ailleurs appelé à un renforcement de l’action militaire en vue de défaire les groupes djihadistes, et plus particulièrement l’EI dans la zone du Liptako-Gourma, qui s’étend aux frontières du Mali, du Niger et du Burkina Faso et comprend la région de Tillabéri. Ils ont certes souligné l’importance des efforts de développement et de meilleure gouvernance, mais sur le terrain, le volet militaire prédomine en dépit des répercussions sur les communautés.

L’offensive de «Barkhane» et des forces du G5 Sahel pourrait réactiver des conflits communautaires.

En effet, l’offensive de « Barkhane » et des forces du G5 Sahel pourrait réactiver des conflits communautaires que l’EI sait parfaitement exploiter en se présentant comme un protecteur des communautés et une alternative à un Etat incapable de répondre aux griefs des populations frontalières, qu’il s’agisse des tensions autour de l’accès aux ressources foncières ou de la sous-représentation des nomades peuls au sein des forces de sécurité. Par ailleurs, les allégations d’abus commis par les forces de sécurité contre les civils sont en forte hausse depuis le début de la contre-offensive et font le lit du recrutement de nouveaux djihadistes. En parallèle d’une action militaire qui reste nécessaire, l’Etat devrait redoubler d’efforts politiques pour rétablir la paix entre et au sein des communautés, et surtout renouer des liens forts avec elles.

Tensions intercommunautaires

Au Niger, un document ayant filtré début avril recensait 102 civils portés disparus, des hommes issus de communautés nomades dont on soupçonne qu’ils ont été tués par l’armée nigérienne. Le ministre de la défense, Issoufou Katambe, a promis qu’une enquête permettra de disculper l’armée, mais sur le terrain le fossé continue de se creuser entre les communautés nomades et l’Etat. Le 30 avril, un rapport de la mission des Nations unies au Mali, la Minusma, a rapporté pour la période janvier-mars une augmentation de 61 % du nombre de violations des droits humains, dont 34 exécutions extrajudiciaires menées par l’armée nigérienne opérant au Mali.

Déjà, en 2017 et 2018, lors de la dernière offensive militaire d’ampleur dans la région frontalière, le Niger et l’opération « Barkhane » s’étaient alliés à des milices ethniques maliennes rivales d’autres communautés, des nomades peuls en particulier. Les offensives des milices maliennes ont d’abord semblé affaiblir l’EI dans la région de Tillabéri, mais elles ont ravivé les tensions intercommunautaires et causé le décès de nombreux civils. Cela a poussé de nombreux habitants de la région à rejoindre les rangs de l’EI et un nombre croissant de communautés, bien au-delà des seuls Peuls, à accepter la présence des militants djihadistes comme un moindre mal. Dès que l’étreinte militaire de « Barkhane » et des milices s’est relâchée, en 2019, l’EI est donc revenu plus fort que jamais.

En 2018 comme aujourd’hui, l’option militaire n’apporte à l’Etat que des succès à court terme s’il ne s’accompagne pas d’un véritable projet politique pour consolider ces acquis. Le Niger devrait le savoir, après avoir déjà emprunté une voie plus politique pour sortir des insurrections touareg des années 1990-2000. Les opérations militaires restent une composante essentielle de la résolution de la crise sécuritaire, mais la réponse politique dans la région de Tillabéri doit prendre les devants. Afin d’endiguer la montée en puissance de l’EI, le Niger – avec le soutien de ses partenaires étrangers – devrait commencer par reconnaître ses propres responsabilités dans la marginalisation des communautés frontalières et proposer un plan ambitieux pour répondre à leurs griefs.

l’EI ne représente pas qu’une menace sécuritaire, il constitue également une véritable alternative à l’Etat en matière de gouvernance.

Pour y parvenir, le Niger a des atouts à faire valoir. Contrairement au Mali et au Burkina Faso, il n’a pas eu recours à des milices ethniques et groupes de vigilance issus de ses propres communautés pour combattre les djihadistes, une mesure qui aurait exacerbé les tensions entre celles-ci. Le Niger a en outre déjà prouvé, par le passé, être capable d’intégrer des représentants de certaines communautés nomades à des hauts postes au sein de l’Etat central et des institutions sécuritaires. Enfin, Niamey peut s’appuyer sur des institutions telles que la Haute Autorité pour la consolidation de la paix (HACP), qui, si elle est bien utilisée, peut coordonner les actions de l’Etat et mener des actions rapides, par exemple pour apaiser les relations entre forces de sécurité et civils dans les régions frontalières.

Protection des civils et du bétail

Les précédentes tentatives de dialogue avec les communautés de Tillabéri ont bien enregistré quelques maigres progrès, mais elles ont souvent souffert de la primauté des actions militaires. Et même lorsque le dialogue était l’option privilégiée, il a été miné par un manque de coordination et de consensus au sein des cercles du pouvoir central. Le gouvernement nigérien devrait donner la priorité au dialogue avec les nomades peuls, groupe le plus marginalisé, tout en facilitant des accords entre et au sein des différentes communautés. Niamey devrait également développer des solutions pour résoudre la compétition autour des ressources foncières et du bétail, qui nourrit la plupart des conflits entre communautés dans la région.

S’il est difficile à envisager dans le contexte actuel, le dialogue avec les djihadistes devrait être également relancé. Il peut susciter des défections au sein de l’EI, y compris de commandants issus des communautés frontalières. L’Etat devra opérer avec prudence pour éviter des représailles des djihadistes contre ceux qui coopèrent avec les autorités. Afin de redorer son image auprès des communautés de la région de Tillabéri, Niamey pourrait par ailleurs demander à ses forces de sécurité de ne pas se consacrer exclusivement aux opérations contre-terroristes et les assigner à la protection des civils et du bétail. Parallèlement, les autorités pourraient assouplir les mesures qui limitent les mouvements de population ou l’activité des marchés, imposées pour des raisons de sécurité mais qui affaiblissent l’économie de Tillabéri et compliquent les liens entre l’Etat et les communautés de la région.

Au Niger, l’EI ne représente pas qu’une menace sécuritaire, il constitue également aux yeux des communautés frontalières une véritable alternative à l’Etat en matière de gouvernance. Il convient donc de lui apporter une réponse sur ces deux fronts, sécuritaire et politique.