The New Kosovo Protectorate
The New Kosovo Protectorate
Table of Contents
  1. Executive Summary
How to Relaunch the Kosovo-Serbia Dialogue
How to Relaunch the Kosovo-Serbia Dialogue

The New Kosovo Protectorate

The ICG Balkans Report N°66, “Kosovo: Let’s Learn from Bosnia”, of 17 May 1999 looked at how experience in Bosnia could be useful in Kosovo, and also at the extent to which the Rambouillet agreement of 23 February 1999 resembled the Dayton agreement of 21 November 1995.

Executive Summary

The ICG Balkans Report N°66, “Kosovo: Let’s Learn from Bosnia”, of 17 May 1999 looked at how experience in Bosnia could be useful in Kosovo, and also at the extent to which the Rambouillet agreement of 23 February 1999 resembled the Dayton agreement of 21 November 1995.

Now, following the campaign of NATO air strikes against Yugoslavia, a new framework of military and civilian involvement in Kosovo has been established by means of UN Security Council Resolution 1244 of 10 June 1999.  This mechanism ensures the legality of the operation and contents the Russians and Chinese.  It has also left the UN in charge of civilian implementation.

The new model is reminiscent of the old League of Nations mandates in that it charges the foreign administrators with preparing Kosovo for self-government.  It is unlike the mandates in that it is vague about the final status of Kosovo, but in the present volatile state of the Balkans that is sensible: the environment in which the future of Kosovo is finally decided will be very different from the present.

The operation in Kosovo offers the international community a new chance to deserve that name.  This new opportunity for international organisations (UN, OSCE, EU and so on) to work in partnership rather than rivalry must not fail, if the world is to develop a means of handling similar future catastrophes.

Sarajevo, 20 June 1999

How to Relaunch the Kosovo-Serbia Dialogue

Online Event to discuss Crisis Group's report "Relaunching the Kosovo-Serbia Dialogue", in which we discussed what currently stands in the way of a new status quo and what it will take to relaunch the process with the Pristina elections in view.

Thirteen years after Kosovo broke away from Serbia, the two countries remain mired in mutual non-recognition, with deleterious effects on both. The parties need to move past technicalities to tackle the main issues at stake: Pristina’s independence and Belgrade’s influence over Kosovo’s Serbian minority.

In this conversation, we discussed what currently stands in the way of a new status quo and what it will take to relaunch the process with the Pristina elections in view.

How to Relaunch the Kosovo-Serbia Dialogue (Online Event, 28th January 2021)

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