Region & Country

Report / Asia

Risky Competition: Strengthening U.S.-China Crisis Management

As their strategic rivalry grows, China and the U.S. are increasingly operating in close proximity in the Asia Pacific. An accident or misinterpreted signal could set off a wider confrontation. The danger level is low, but dialogue is needed to dial it down further.

Also available in 简体中文

Open Letter to the U.S. and Iranian Leadership about the Iran Nuclear Deal

Negotiating parties are now within touching distance of reinstating the JCPOA, but a period of stasis threatens to undo the progress made. In this open letter, over 40 former top European officials urge the U.S. and Iranian leadership to see the negotiations through to a successful outcome.

Examining U.S. Interests and Regional Cooperation in the Eastern Mediterranean

In a 31 March hearing before the U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs, Crisis Group’s Deputy Program Director for Europe and Central Asia Alissa de Carbonnel testified on energy diplomacy in the eastern Mediterranean, U.S. interests and regional cooperation.

A Twist in Caracas: Is a Venezuela-U.S. Reboot on the Cards?

High-ranking U.S. officials made a surprise trip to Venezuela’s capital, hinting at efforts to improve bilateral relations and end the standoff between the Maduro government and its opponents. The backdrop is Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, which just might be changing strategic calculations an ocean away.  

Also available in Español

Targeted Killing and the Rule of Law: The Legal and Human Costs of 20 Years of U.S. Drone Strikes

In a 9 February 2022 hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Crisis Group’s Chief of Policy Stephen Pomper recommended legal reform to reinvigorate Congress’s decision-making role in the current legal and structural status quo on U.S. counter-terrorism operations.

Podcast / Asia

Western Policy and Afghanistan’s Humanitarian Devastation

This week on Hold Your Fire! Richard Atwood and Naz Modirazadeh talk to Crisis Group Consultant Graeme Smith about Afghanistan and what can be done to prevent millions from falling into famine as winter approaches.

Commentary / United States

What the Facebook Whistleblower Reveals about Social Media and Conflict

Former Facebook employee Frances Haugen’s recent testimony before the U.S. Senate reasserted the platform’s role in propagating misinformation that feeds conflict offline. Facebook should do more to reduce the spread of harmful content by revamping its moderation capacities and modifying its algorithm.

The War on Terror: Twenty More Years? (Online Event, 20th October 2021)

This online panel discusses the United States’s 20 years so-called War on Terror. Read more in the report Overkill: Reforming the Legal Basis for the U.S. War on Terror

Virtual Roundtable: What Happens After Nicaragua's One-sided Poll? (Online Event, 13th October 2021)

This virtual roundtable assesses the risks of turmoil and political violence, the aggravation of the country’s humanitarian predicament resulting in a surge of emigration and its significance for the region’s democratic backslide.

Misunderstanding Yemen

U.S. efforts to uproot al-Qaeda’s Yemeni franchise often overlooked the country’s mercurial politics. As part of our series The Legacy of 9/11 and the “War on Terror”, Peter Salisbury explains that the sectarianism the group espoused is still rife on all sides of Yemen’s war.

Op-Ed / United States

Biden Wants to Convince the U.N. That America Is Back. The World Isn’t So Sure.

The administration hasn’t shown much desire to work with the U.N. on recent crises, but Biden can use Covid-19 and climate change to make his case to the doubters.

Report / United States

Overkill: Reforming the Legal Basis for the U.S. War on Terror

After the 9/11 attacks, the U.S. Congress passed a use of force authorisation that successive presidents have used to expand military action ever further. As part of our series The Legacy of 9/11 and the “War on Terror”, we argue that Washington should enact a new statute that promotes transparency and narrows the war’s scope.

Podcast / United States

License to Kill: Lawyering in the War on Terror

In this episode of Hold Your Fire!, Richard Atwood and Naz Modirzadeh talk with Stephen Pomper, Crisis Group’s Interim Chief of Policy, about the legal basis for the “war on terror” and how successive American administrations have used sweeping 2001 legislation for an ever-expanding war against jihadist militants. 

The Anxiety Effect: How 9/11 and Its Aftermath Changed Gulf Arab States’ Relations with the U.S.

Post-9/11 events have shaken Riyadh’s and Abu Dhabi’s faith in the durability of Washington’s support. As part of our series, The Legacy of 9/11 and the “War on Terror”, Dina Esfandiary says U.S.-Gulf ties will likely not regain the strength they had twenty years ago.

How the Counter-terrorism Imperative Has Warped U.S.-Egyptian Ties

The conflict in Egypt’s Sinai offers insights into U.S. foreign policy priorities. As part of our series The Legacy of 9/11 and the “War on Terror”, Michael Wahid Hanna argues Cairo has used the jihadist spectre to scare off critics and keep U.S. military aid flowing.

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