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Liberia

Briefing / Africa

Liberia: Time for Much-Delayed Reconciliation and Reform

Unemployment, corruption, nepotism and impunity threaten to entrench social and political divisions and jeopardise Liberia’s democracy unless the government addresses persisting historical enmities.

Podcast / Africa

Liberia: Reconciliation and Reform

Titi Ajayi, West Africa Fellow, talks to Gabriela Keseberg Dávalos, Senior Communications Officer, about lessons learned from the last electoral process in Liberia and what the country should do to consolidate peace and democracy.

Statement / Africa

Taylor Verdict a Warning to War Crimes Perpetrators

The landmark guilty verdict today against former Liberian President Charles Ghankay Taylor is a warning to those most responsible for atrocity crimes that they can be held accountable.

Op-Ed / Africa

Liberia: the post-election challenges

Originally published in openDemocracy

Report / Africa

Liberia: How Sustainable Is the Recovery?

Liberia’s October 2011 presidential elections are an opportunity to consolidate its fragile peace and nascent democracy.

Op-Ed / Global

First Lehman Brothers, Next Liberia?

Originally published in The Globalist

Report / Africa

Liberia: Uneven Progress in Security Sector Reform

Since independence and for fourteen years of war, Liberia’s army, police and other security agencies have mostly been sources of insecurity and misery for a destitute people. The internationally driven attempt to radically reform the security sector since the war’s end in 2003 is a major chance to put this right and prevent new destabilisation.

Op-Ed / Africa

Liberia's Small Steps on Reform

Originally published in The Boston Globe

Report / Africa

Liberia: Resurrecting the Justice System

Reform of the justice system needs to be a top priority for Liberia’s new government and donors alike. After fourteen years of civil war, the system is in shambles.