Arrow Left Arrow Right Camera icon set icon set Ellipsis icon set Facebook Favorite Globe Hamburger List Mail Map Marker Map Microphone Minus PDF Play Print RSS Search Share Trash Twitter Video Camera Youtube
Toward a Lasting Ceasefire in Gaza
Toward a Lasting Ceasefire in Gaza
Table of Contents
  1. Overview
Le Parti travailliste présente un plan de séparation unilatéral en Cisjordanie
Le Parti travailliste présente un plan de séparation unilatéral en Cisjordanie

Toward a Lasting Ceasefire in Gaza

To achieve a durable ceasefire, not only must Israel significantly change its policy toward Gaza, but, no less importantly, Hamas and the Palestine Liberation Organisation must take further steps to implement their reconciliation agreement in order to enable reconstruction and stabilise daily life in the Strip.

I. Overview

More than seven weeks after the most devastating war yet waged in Gaza, its underlying causes remain unresolved. Hamas did not achieve an end to Gaza’s closure; Israel did not attain the demilitarisation of the Strip or Hamas. The Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO) remains unrepresentative and its credibility continues to fade. Fatah’s popularity has sunk while Hamas’s has increased to levels unseen since its 2006 electoral victory. Small steps toward reconciliation between Hamas and the PLO have been taken, but they are very distant from the end goal of a unified, representative Palestinian leadership. But in reconciliation lies the only hope of achieving a sustainable ceasefire and, more broadly, of bringing Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank under one authority.

Israel, much of the PLO and the international community fear the possible consequences of integrating Hamas into the Palestinian national movement, as is called for in the Hamas-PLO reconciliation agreement signed on 23 April 2014. At the same time, many recognise that thwarting even the partial implementation of that agreement pushed a desperate Hamas toward war. So they, together with Hamas, have settled for the time being on a temporary fix, which is forestall robust PLO reform while permitting some significant but limited steps toward Palestinian reconciliation, including allowing the new Palestinian Authority (PA) government, formed on 2 June 2014, to regain formal control of Gaza, patrol its borders, staff its crossings, and pay salaries to employees previously paid by Hamas, all while leaving Hamas’s military wing as the strongest power within Gaza and the true guarantor of security there.

This arrangement, should it crystallise, would allow all parties to pursue their short-term interests. Hamas would be able to rebuild its military capabilities (albeit faced with greater obstacles than in the past), and Gaza’s population would receive aid and reconstruction. The Palestinian Authority would have the opportunity to gain a toehold in Gaza. The PLO, though concerned that it will be helping to strengthen Hamas and reward its violence, will secure increased Western support and be able to more credibly claim that it represents all Palestinians. And Israel would enjoy quiet for a period of unknown but longer duration than in the past, as it and Hamas prepare for the next battle.

With Gaza and Israel having fought their third war in six years, a more lasting respite would be welcome. Of course avoiding another eventual war requires a longer-term strategy that helps establish a Palestinian state. But with two-state negotiations in hiatus, the best the parties can hope for today is a more stable, durable ceasefire. This will depend not only on ensuring that the reconciliation agreement is implemented, but also on a significant change in Israeli policy toward Gaza. There are nascent indications of a belated realisation among policymakers that constricting the territory has compromised Israel’s security and helped bring about the war. The extent of these indications will be crystallised in indirect ceasefire talks between Israel and Hamas, scheduled for late October. Another set of upcoming negotiations, between Hamas and the PLO, will be no less important, as Gaza cannot hope for real change if the PA’s technocratic government of national consensus does not take up its responsibilities – at least regarding Gaza’s borders and the payment of its government employees.

If a stable modus vivendi is not reached, the new PA government is at risk of collapsing, and with it, reconstruction, development and short-term stability for Israel and for Gaza. To prevent this, the parties should:

  • Address the salary crisis by ensuring the bulk of civil servants hired since 2007 are paid. A Swiss-Norwegian-UN mechanism, which provides for paying these civil servants during a three-month period while they are vetted to exclude militants and the payroll rationalised, should be prioritised and implemented quickly. After the vetting process, donors should ensure a sustainable way to pay these employees.
     
  • Consolidate the national consensus government. While the Palestinian Authority’s dependence on Western funding means that reconciliation can advance only in adherence with Quartet Principles, much can be done: PLO reform, addressing social aspects of reconciliation (including the resolution of disputes over deaths and injuries from Hamas-Fatah fighting in 2006-2007), increasing personal and political freedoms for Fatah in Gaza and Hamas in the West Bank, reactivating the Palestinian Legislative Council, and overseeing Gaza reconstruction by a committee comprised of representatives of all factions.
     
  • Facilitate the movement of goods and people into and out of Gaza to enable reconstruction and stabilise daily life. So long as cement can be accounted for under the rigorous mechanism established to monitor so-called dual-use materials, and assurances provided that it is not being diverted for uses other than those intended, Israel should not block the functioning of the mechanism even should it discover tunnel construction that has utilised cement acquired through some other means. Donors should make ensuring the smooth functioning of the mechanism a priority.
     
  • Increase travel through the Rafah crossing, Gaza’s primary outlet to the outside world. Egypt will continue to make any changes at the Rafah crossing subject to its national security considerations, but it has long stated that it will greatly reduce restrictions once the PA’s security forces have begun working at the crossing and along the Gaza-Egypt border. The international community should encourage Egypt and the PA to live up to their pledges.

The international community will have a big role to play. Donors must do more than merely pledge money, which will achieve little if projects they fund cannot be implemented. Donor states must press both Israel and the Palestinian Authority to do their part. This requires supporting at least minimalist Palestinian reconciliation, a sine qua non of PA activity in Gaza, which in turn is necessary for reconstruction, without which a durable ceasefire is unlikely to hold.

In this new Arab era, this necessity holds no less for regional powers such as, on one side, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Egypt, and, on the other, Qatar and Turkey. With the region polarised into Islamist and anti-Islamist camps – and with Hamas, an offshoot of the Muslim Brotherhood, sitting directly on the fault line – Western reluctance to engage Hamas and encourage a joint Palestinian agenda is now but one among several large obstacles standing in its way. That in the current moment Israel seems to have more interest than many of its Arab neighbours in boosting Gaza is certainly an ironic complicating factor – but so too does it offer an opportunity that should be grasped.

Gaza City/Jerusalem/Ramallah/Brussels, 23 October 2014

Le Parti travailliste présente un plan de séparation unilatéral en Cisjordanie

Originally published in Orient XXI

Après n’avoir, pendant longtemps, proposé aucune solution de rechange à l’approche «  gestionnaire  » du conflit israélo-palestinien privilégiée par le premier ministre Benyamin Nétanyahou, la laissant apparaître comme la seule option possible, le Parti travailliste relance le débat au niveau national en présentant un plan de séparation.

La démarche des travaillistes marque une rupture. Le parti n’avait plus adopté de programme concernant le conflit depuis son congrès de 2002. Lors des élections de 2013 et 2015, il avait fait campagne exclusivement sur des thèmes socioéconomiques. Pour les dirigeants et stratèges du parti, défendre la solution à deux États ne pouvait que diminuer les chances de succès aux élections nationales. Ils préféraient concentrer leur message sur l’augmentation du pouvoir d’achat et favorisaient des slogans comme «  une troisième assistante maternelle à la crèche  ».

Les dynamiques internes qui ont conduit le parti à défendre ce nouveau plan étaient à l’œuvre longtemps avant le regain de violence d’octobre 2015 entre Israéliens et Palestiniens. Toutefois le fait que le parti ait débattu du plan et l’ait approuvé alors que la violence s’intensifiait et qu’il était confronté à une chute spectaculaire dans les sondages explique en grande partie l’insistance sur la séparation plutôt que sur l’enjeu global d’un accord israélo-palestinien. Plus de 70 % de la population estime que la politique antiterroriste du gouvernement est un échec, tandis que face aux défis de la mondialisation et aux menaces sécuritaires permanentes, les juifs d’Israël donnent plus que jamais la priorité à la préservation de leur identité ethnique aux dépens de la consolidation d’une citoyenneté égalitaire. Sans surprise, le soutien à la division de Jérusalem sur des lignes ethniques a considérablement augmenté au cours de cet épisode violent.[fn]Tandis que fin 2014 la division de Jérusalem selon des lignes démographiques recueillait quelque 56 % d’opinions défavorables et 38 % d’opinions favorables, la tendance s’était inversée fin 2015. Quelque 69 % des sondés exprimaient leur soutien à cette politique et ils n’étaient plus que 24 % à insister sur le maintien de la souveraineté d’Israël dans les parties arabes de la ville. Zipi Israeli, Public Opinion and National Security, Strategic Survey for Israel 2015-2016, The Institute for National Security Studies, p. 119.Hide Footnote

LA SOLUTION À DEUX ÉTATS, BUT ULTIME  ?

Le plan appelle à séparer d’abord les Israéliens des Palestiniens, puis à aller dans un second temps vers la solution à deux États. Cela contraste avec le paradigme traditionnel du Parti travailliste consistant à privilégier des négociations directes, bilatérales pour parvenir à un accord sur le statut final. Sur le fond, le plan de séparation porte sur quatre volets :

- en Cisjordanie, il propose de parachever la construction du mur de séparation, d’éviter les constructions en dehors des «  blocs de colonies  » et de transférer à l’Autorité palestinienne le pouvoir civil sur les zones situées au-delà du mur  ;

- en ce qui concerne Jérusalem, il appelle à exclure des limites administratives de la ville de nombreux villages palestiniens devenus des quartiers de Jérusalem-Est  ;

- à Gaza, il suggère de stabiliser le cessez-le-feu et d’inciter à la démilitarisation par le développement de la bande  ;

- et au niveau régional, il appelle Israël à répondre officiellement à l’Initiative de paix arabe[fn]Cette «  initiative  », présentée en 2002 par le roi Adballah d’Arabie saoudite et adoptée par la Ligue arabe offrait une reconnaissance générale de l’État d’Israël par les membres de la Ligue arabe en contrepartie d’un retrait israélien sur les frontières du 5 juin 1967 et d’une solution mutuellement acceptée en faveur des réfugiés palestiniens.Hide Footnote que le pays a ignorée depuis 2002 et à organiser une conférence sur la sécurité régionale en vue d’éliminer l’islam radical et de lancer les bases d’un dialogue régional sur un accord de paix israélo-palestinien.

Au-delà de ces propositions, le postulat fondamental du plan — à savoir que la solution à deux États est actuellement irréalisable — ainsi que l’accent mis sur la séparation des Israéliens et des Palestiniens et sa rhétorique ethnocentrique, ont soulevé de nombreuses questions quant à son intérêt sur le fond et aux bénéfices électoraux que le parti pourrait en tirer.

Les affirmations selon lesquelles le Parti travailliste aurait changé son paradigme et ne serait plus attaché à la solution à deux États sont sans fondement. Le plan précise ainsi qu’un accord sur le statut final doit être basé sur plusieurs éléments issus des différentes versions de la solution à deux États : les paramètres Clinton de décembre 2000, les accords et les plans formulés depuis le début des négociations entre autres par la députée et alliée du Parti travailliste Tzipi Livni, et la trame générale présentée par le député Hilik Bar.

Ce que le Parti travailliste a changé, c’est sa stratégie pour parvenir à la solution à deux États. Dans son nouveau plan, il ne se concentre plus exclusivement sur des négociations concernant le statut final, mais privilégie une approche par étapes vers une réalité à deux États qui passe principalement par le soutien à la séparation entre Israéliens et Palestiniens. Le plan appelle Israël à prendre des mesures accréditant l’idée selon laquelle la poursuite de son contrôle militaire sur la Cisjordanie est motivée par une véritable nécessité sécuritaire plutôt que par sa volonté de concrétiser des revendications historiques via l’entreprise de colonisation.

LE DIABLE EST DANS LES DÉTAILS

Ceux qui lisent le plan dans une perspective politique (plutôt qu’électorale), comme l’ont fait la plupart des observateurs extérieurs, le trouvent bancal, estiment qu’il a été élaboré par des amateurs et que son application risque de susciter davantage de radicalisation et de violence. Le plan est avare de détails. Pourtant, tous les détails ne sont pas triviaux  ; certains peuvent en effet être décisifs.

Quelques éléments centraux du plan semblent contreproductifs au regard de l’objectif déclaré. L’idée de consolider le contrôle israélien sur les «  blocs de colonies  », soi-disant pour préserver la solution à deux États, est très controversée, les Palestiniens et beaucoup, au niveau international, considérant certaines zones au sein des blocs tels que délimités par Israël comme non négociables et donc décisives pour la faisabilité de cette solution. En outre, le plan appelle à compléter le mur le long d’un itinéraire tortueux que de nombreux responsables sécuritaires israéliens critiquent en raison de sa longueur excessive et des multiples segments vulnérables pour des raisons topographiques.

De même, exclure unilatéralement des quartiers arabes de Jérusalem-Est des limites administratives de la ville et priver des habitants de leur droit de résidence, sans coordination avec un interlocuteur palestinien — que cela se passe ou non derrière un nouveau mur — créerait un vide dans lequel le Hamas et divers éléments extrémistes pourraient prospérer, mettant en danger la sécurité des Israéliens que cette démarche prétend vouloir protéger. Et supposer, comme le fait le plan censé favoriser la paix, que les Palestiniens renonceront entièrement à la vieille ville de Jérusalem et à ses environs ne fait que renforcer les antagonismes et l’hostilité des Palestiniens vis-à-vis des intentions générales du Parti travailliste dans la ville et au-delà.

Il n’y a aucune raison non plus de penser que le Hamas renoncera à la violence en échange de la reconstruction de Gaza alors que même pour les dirigeants les moins ambitieux du mouvement, la résistance ne peut prendre fin avant que la Cisjordanie et Jérusalem-Est soient libérés du contrôle israélien.

Que les dirigeants travaillistes considèrent ou non ces propositions comme désavantageuses pour Israël, ils ont de toute évidence élaboré ce plan car leur objectif immédiat, on le comprend, est de gagner le soutien de la majorité de la population israélienne. Il s’agit avant tout d’embarrasser Nétanyahou en démontrant qu’il ne parvient pas à résoudre un problème stratégique majeur, et qu’il est incapable d’assurer la sécurité des citoyens israéliens — à cause de sa position idéologique hostile à un État palestinien et au coût inévitable de la création de celui-ci, y compris le renoncement à la plupart des parties arabes de la Cisjordanie et de Jérusalem, aussi en raison de son engagement politique vis-à-vis de ses alliés religieux, favorables à la colonisation. Surtout, le Parti travailliste entend souligner que les mesures qu’il recommande peuvent être mises en œuvre sans prendre aucun risque d’un point de vue sécuritaire. L’engagement pris dans le plan de maintenir l’armée israélienne en Cisjordanie vise à montrer que le Parti travailliste ne répétera pas les erreurs commises par Israël lors de son retrait de Gaza en 2005.

Dans une perspective électorale, que ce plan soit ou non celui que le Parti travailliste mettrait en œuvre s’il était au pouvoir est sans importance. Voilà pourquoi ses dirigeants préconisent d’achever la construction du mur sans reconnaître aucune des raisons pour lesquelles elle n’a pas encore été terminée. C’est également pour cela qu’ils appellent à diviser Jérusalem sans coordination avec un interlocuteur palestinien, même si la plupart d’entre eux préféreraient en réalité une concertation. Et c’est la raison pour laquelle ils mettent en avant ce que les experts israéliens qualifient de «  promesse vide  » sur la démilitarisation de Gaza. Enfin, cela explique pourquoi le Parti travailliste présente un plan qui, sur le papier, semble pouvoir être mis en œuvre sans consentement palestinien : parce qu’il s’attache à montrer aux Israéliens les négligences de Nétanyahou.

Ces considérations déterminent non seulement le contenu du plan, mais aussi sa tonalité. Contrairement à la rhétorique cosmopolite du «  gagnant-gagnant  » et à l’accent mis sur le droit international qui caractérisent l’Initiative de Genève[fn]L’Initiative (ou Accord) de Genève est un plan de paix détaillé signé en décembre 2003 par deux groupes de responsables politiques israéliens et palestiniens sans position formelle, emmenés par Yossi Beilin et Yasser Abed Rabbo. Il prévoit un retrait israélien quasi total des territoires palestiniens occupés, une partition en fonction des lieux d’habitation majoritaires de Jérusalem, capitale des deux États, et des solutions essentiellement financières sans retour possible sur le territoire israélien pour les réfugiés palestiniens.Hide Footnote , dispositif informel que d’éminents dirigeants de gauche israéliens ont établi avec leurs homologues palestiniens, le Parti travailliste a maintenant embrassé la rhétorique de l’intérêt national. Lors du lancement du plan, le président du parti Yitzhak Herzog a déclaré : «  Je veux me débarrasser d’autant de Palestiniens que possible, le plus rapidement possible  ».

NE PAS VISER TROP HAUT

Par le passé, les responsables travaillistes se félicitaient quand les dirigeants palestiniens soutenaient leur point de vue : ils citaient des déclarations congruentes comme preuve de la faisabilité de leurs propositions. Pourtant aujourd’hui, Herzog présente le rejet palestinien du plan — par exemple, l’objection de l’Autorité palestinienne concernant la séparation des villages palestiniens de Jérusalem — comme un gage de son intérêt pour les Israéliens. En ce sens, le plan est proposé dans la perspective d’un jeu à somme nulle qui a fini par dominer la mentalité israélienne depuis que Nétanyahou est au pouvoir. Pire, en se concentrant sur la séparation et en omettant d’évoquer la possibilité d’accords intérimaires, le plan suggère que pour le Parti travailliste, l’Organisation de libération de la Palestine (OLP) n’est plus un partenaire, y compris pour des accords de paix plus modestes. Ceci déplaît aux étrangers et, bien sûr, aux Palestiniens. Cependant, tandis que les travaillistes font face à une crise électorale dramatique et que les juifs israéliens font de plus en plus de la préservation de leur identité ethnique une priorité, la direction du parti a choisi de mettre l’accent plus nettement que jamais sur la séparation.

Le plan déplace le Parti travailliste vers la droite sur l’échiquier politique israélien, le rapprochant de ceux qui estiment nécessaire de se séparer des Palestiniens pour qu’Israël préserve son caractère d’État-nation démocratique pour le peuple juif, mais pensent qu’il est impossible d’atteindre cet objectif actuellement par un accord mettant fin au conflit. Beaucoup de ces personnes ont jusqu’à présent opté pour le Likoud, le considérant comme le seul parti ne risquant pas d’exposer Israël à des problèmes sécuritaires inconsidérés. Ce raisonnement a gagné du terrain chez les Israéliens depuis que les États arabes autour d’eux se sont effondrés ou ont vacillé. Les craintes que la Palestine puisse devenir un État failli d’où seraient lancés des roquettes et des mortiers en direction d’Israël semblent de plus en plus fondées.

Avec ce plan, en particulier à un moment où la violence parait insurmontable et où les électeurs israéliens sont focalisés sur la sécurité, ils auraient à choisir entre ce qu’ils percevraient comme la politique pragmatique et sécuritaire du Parti travailliste et la politique empreinte d’idéologie du Likoud qui enfermerait Israël dans un problème insoluble. Son insistance sur le fait qu’un accord sur le statut final devra comprendre la reconnaissance mutuelle des deux États-nations — perçue par les Israéliens comme l’indice le plus significatif d’un changement d’intentions côté palestinien — et faire l’objet d’un référendum national (plutôt que d’une simple validation), rend le Parti travailliste et son plan plus acceptables.

CONSÉQUENCES POUR 2016

Que pourrait bien changer ce plan  ? Il est loin d’être certain qu’il puisse faire du Parti travailliste la pièce maîtresse du prochain gouvernement israélien. Il pourrait toutefois avoir une influence sur le débat national. Deux changements et une tendance importante peuvent déjà être identifiés. Tout d’abord, au lendemain de l’adoption par le Parti travailliste de son plan de séparation, Nétanyahou, qui ne l’avait pas fait depuis son entrée en fonction en 2009, s’est engagé publiquement à compléter le mur (dans le cadre d’un projet plus vaste consistant à construire des murs de défense le long des frontières israéliennes). Trois semaines plus tard, il a fait adopter par le gouvernement un décret en vue de la poursuite de la construction du mur (autour de Jérusalem et des collines du sud de Hébron) malgré l’opposition des forces favorables à la colonisation en Israël et au sein de son parti[fn]Les représentants des colons craignent qu’Israël ne revendique plus la souveraineté sur les 92 % de la Cisjordanie situés au-delà du mur — dont 75 colonies israéliennes où vivent quelque 85 000 colons — et que cette zone fasse finalement partie d’un État palestinien.Hide Footnote , et en dépit des réserves des responsables sécuritaires concernant le tracé inférieur du mur.

Deuxièmement, depuis la publication du plan, le bien-fondé du contrôle par Israël des quartiers arabes de Jérusalem — incontesté pendant près d’une décennie — est remis en question. Certains travaillistes, comme les députés de la Knesset Omer Bar-Lev, Hilik Bar et l’ancien ministre de la défense Amir Peretz, défendent la proposition du Parti travailliste dans les médias et le ministre de l’éducation Naftali Bennett, artisan d’une ligne dure, défie Herzog en décidant que les écoles israéliennes célébreront en 2016 l’unité de Jérusalem. La déclaration du premier ministre britannique David Cameron, qui avait estimé quelques jours plus tard lors d’un débat parlementaire que «  l’encerclement effectif de Jérusalem-Est est sincèrement choquant  » a renforcé la position pro-partition et pourrait servir d’exemple sur la façon dont les déclarations occidentales peuvent avoir une influence constructive sur le débat public en Israël.

Alors que les alliés potentiels des travaillistes dans la partie juive d’Israël (centristes, ultra-orthodoxes, russophones, séfarades) ont en général salué le plan, les citoyens israéliens arabo-palestiniens en ont clairement une opinion négative. Sa rhétorique ethnocentrique renforce les tendances actuelles qui poussent la minorité nationale vers l’aliénation, en rompant avec l’establishment politique israélien. Si même l’opposition au sein de la majorité juive d’Israël ne propose pas une politique alternative inclusive vis-à-vis de la minorité nationale, la probabilité augmente que les citoyens arabes se retirent du processus électoral démocratique en Israël. De plus, pour avoir des chances de reconquérir le pouvoir, le Parti travailliste pourrait bien avoir besoin du soutien des partis arabes – un soutien que le plan rend encore moins vraisemblable.

QUE RÉSERVE L’AVENIR  ?

La pertinence du plan dépendra également — voire principalement, selon certains — des événements. Plus précisément, si la violence continuait ou s’intensifiait, préconiser la séparation trouverait, peut-être de façon tragique, un plus grand écho au sein de la population israélienne. En fonction de l’origine de ses auteurs, Jérusalémites ou Cisjordaniens, la division à Jérusalem et l’achèvement de la construction du mur seraient susceptibles, respectivement, de gagner en popularité.

Reste à savoir comment les travaillistes s’efforceraient de mettre le plan en œuvre. La stratégie choisie pourrait avoir des conséquences importantes pour les Israéliens en général et le parti en particulier. Herzog n’a pas un style de gouvernance audacieux. Ce sont les dynamiques internes au parti qui l’ont finalement poussé à approuver le plan. Les députés travaillistes Hilik Bar et Omer Bar-Lev ont tous deux publié des programmes progressistes au sujet du conflit plusieurs mois avant que la violence éclate, fin 2015. C’est aussi le cas du député Amir Peretz du parti Hatnuah (il a depuis réintégré le Parti travailliste). Surtout, c’est sur la base du plan de Bar que sept cents membres du congrès du Parti travailliste ont contraint Herzog à convoquer la réunion du parti qui a vu l’adoption du plan. Les travaillistes pousseraient-ils leur parti à faire un pas de plus  ? Au vu du passé, Herzog ne le ferait pas lui-même. Un groupe de députés travaillistes soutiendrait-il désormais des projets de loi au Parlement basés sur les éléments progressistes des différentes propositions qui ne sont pas repris dans le plan du parti  ? Les députés travaillistes soutiendraient-ils par exemple un projet de loi d’évacuation volontaire, moyennant compensation, pour les colons installés au-delà du mur, comme le plan de Bar l’envisageait  ? Feraient-ils passer un projet de loi demandant au gouvernement israélien de déclarer qu’Israël est prêt à se retirer de la plupart des terres de Cisjordanie et à se dissocier de la population palestinienne qui y habite, comme l’a suggéré Bar-Lev, ou de reconnaître l’État palestinien comme Bar l’a proposé  ?

Nul ne peut dire si le parti tirera bénéfice du plan lors des prochaines élections. Cela dépendra de beaucoup de paramètres, notamment de l’évolution du contexte et des personnalités. Si la conjoncture renforçait la pertinence du plan, il est probable que les autres partis s’en réclameraient pour éviter la montée des travaillistes. Si le Likoud adoptait une telle stratégie, le Parti travailliste serait privé de son caractère distinctif, mais aurait la satisfaction de voir ses idées triompher dans le débat politique israélien. Si les partis centristes se dotaient d’un ordre du jour similaire, il ne serait pas en mesure de renforcer considérablement son pouvoir au parlement, mais augmenterait son acceptabilité parmi les faiseurs de rois, ce qui ferait de lui un prétendant sérieux au poste de premier ministre en Israël.