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Yemen Between Reform and Revolution
Yemen Between Reform and Revolution
The Shattering of Yemen: Why Ending the War Is More Difficult Than Ever
The Shattering of Yemen: Why Ending the War Is More Difficult Than Ever

Yemen Between Reform and Revolution

Mass protests have convulsed Yemen in recent months, as the country's established opposition parties have joined large street demonstrations in calling for Ali Abdullah Saleh to abdicate the presidency. April Longley Alley, Crisis Group's Senior Analyst for the Arabian Peninsula, looks at what distinguishes Yemen's protest movement from others throughout North Africa and the Middle East.

In this podcast, April Longley Alley looks at what distinguishes Yemen's protest movement from others throughout North Africa and the Middle East. CRISIS GROUP

The Shattering of Yemen: Why Ending the War Is More Difficult Than Ever

Originally published in Foreign Affairs

U.S. President Joe Biden has made ending Yemen’s civil war a central pillar of his Middle East policy. In his maiden foreign policy address at the State Department, he committed to ending American support for the Saudi-led coalition’s offensive operations and announced the appointment of a U.S. special envoy for Yemen. The war, he said “has created a humanitarian and strategic catastrophe.”

Six months later, however, the catastrophe is only getting worse. The Houthi rebels, who seized the capital of Sanaa in 2014, have intensified their offensive in the governorate of Marib, the internationally recognized government’s last stronghold in the country’s north. Yemen’s twin economic and humanitarian crises have also deepened amid a fuel crisis in the north, a currency collapse in the south, a 50 percent shortfall in funding for the UN’s humanitarian response, and, for good measure, flash floods. Aid agencies believe publicly reported COVID-19 deaths vastly underestimate the real number of people killed by the virus. And diplomacy has stalled: the UN-led cease-fire initiative promoted by the new U.S. envoy has failed to make any progress, and may be beyond resuscitation.

To read the rest of this Op-Ed, please continue on the website of Foreign Affairs here.

Contributors

Program Director, U.S.
mwhanna1
Senior Analyst, Yemen
peterjsalisbury