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Stephen Pomper

Program Director, United States
Washington, D.C.

Crisis Group Role

Steve Pomper is based in Washington, D.C. and is the Director of Crisis Group’s U.S. Program.

Professional Background

Steve Pomper joined Crisis Group from the U.S. Institute of Peace, where he was a senior policy scholar, and the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, where he was a Davis Distinguished Fellow. 

During the Obama Administration, he served on the staff of the National Security Council as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Multilateral Affairs and Human Rights and chaired the interagency Atrocities Prevention Board. He also served as Senior Director for African Affairs. Prior to joining the staff of the National Security Council, he was the Assistant Legal Adviser for Political Military Affairs at the Department of State. Before working in the U.S. Government, he was a lawyer in the private sector, an editor of The Washington Monthly, and a stringer for Time Magazine.  

Steve Pomper is a graduate of Harvard College and Yale Law School.  He is a non-residential Senior Fellow at the Columbia Law School Human Rights Institute and Guest Author for the Just Security web blog.

Languages

  • English (native)
     

In The News

19 Jun 2018
[The UN Human Rights Council is] an imperfect body but it has a decent track record. It could get better, but it stands a worse chance of doing so if the U.S. takes its ball and goes home and allows it to become a playground for strongmen. Bloomberg

Stephen Pomper

Program Director, United States
28 May 2018
[South Korean] President Moon has brought South Korea into the middle of the frame (...) and he again showed Trump the mesmerizing all-consuming media impact that a summit can have — something that’s bound to appeal.”​ Time

Stephen Pomper

Program Director, United States
23 Apr 2018
Une certaine alchimie se développe entre [Président Trump et Président Macron] et qu’elle leur est mutuellement bénéfique. Il a eu un certain nombre de gestes qui ont démontré une forme de respect et cela était manifestement très important pour Président Trump. Radio France International

Stephen Pomper

Program Director, United States
12 Apr 2018
Normalement, ces avertissements servent à minimiser les risques d’escalade, par exemple, si les forces russes sont frappées par inadvertance. Mais le tweet était une provocation. Il jette de l’huile sur le feu. Le Temps

Stephen Pomper

Program Director, United States
12 Apr 2018
When [former U.S. Secretary of State Tillerson] had conversations with foreign leaders, it was often questioned whether or not he was really representing President Trump's views. I don't think Secretary Pompeo will have that problem. VOA

Stephen Pomper

Program Director, United States
10 Mar 2018
Regional players need to push for a concrete, achievable agenda, with realistic expectations [ahead of the U.S.-North Korea summit]. CGTN America

Stephen Pomper

Program Director, United States

Latest Updates

Op-Ed / United States

Why Trump Should Take It Slow With Kim Jong Un

Any successful deal with North Korea will require an extraordinary amount of patience and attention to detail.

Originally published in Politico Magazine

Commentary / United States

Eight Big Questions on War and Peace for Mike Pompeo 

With a dizzying range of international crises and conflicts facing the U.S., the confirmation hearing of incoming Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Thursday 12 April is a chance to gauge the administration's future tack. Crisis Group's U.S. Program Director Stephen Pomper identifies eight critical issues that are likely to dominate Pompeo's incumbency and that senators should raise. 

Op-Ed / United States

The US and ICC May Still Steer Past Each Other–Why and How

Since the International Criminal Court's prosecutor announced that she would seek permission to open an investigation into the situation in Afghanistan, the United States and the ICC have been on a slow motion collision course. The stakes are high for the court, and how these maneuvers unfold could have a profound impact on its future work.

Originally published in Just Security

Commentary / United States

Congress Should Help Rein In Trump's New Pro-war National Security Advisor

Contrarian arguments about John Bolton – that he is smart and that his hawkishness might browbeat U.S. rivals into peace deals – look past a long record that suggests an appetite for forcible regime change, a capacity for shading the truth, and a failure to learn from past mistakes.

Op-Ed / United States

Preventing Atrocity in the Age of Trump

The Obama administration set out to create a future free of genocide. Does that future still have a chance?

Originally published in The Atlantic