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Homepage > Regions / Countries > Europe and Central Asia > Balkans > Kosovo > Setting Kosovo Free: Remaining Challenges

Setting Kosovo Free: Remaining Challenges

Europe Report N°218 10 Sep 2012

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Kosovo has implemented much of the Ahtisaari plan – the blueprint for its democracy, providing substantial rights for Serbs and other minorities – and deserves to be fully independent, but there should be no slippage, and remaining parts of the plan should be honoured. The Pristina government mostly abides by it, and many Serbs south of the Ibar River now accept its authority, obey its laws and take part in political life in a way unimaginable four years ago. These achievements are threatened, however, by the tense Kosovo-Serbia relationship, declining Serb numbers and Pristina’s frustration at its inability to extend its sovereignty to the Serb-majority northern areas and to achieve full international recognition. A surge in ethnically-motivated attacks shows peace is fragile. The government should remain committed to the Ahtisaari requirement for minorities. But the plan was not meant to work in isolation and cannot be separated from the overall Kosovo-Serbia relationship. Belgrade needs to earn Pristina’s trust and acquiescence for its continued involvement on Kosovo territory, especially the south.

The early years of Kosovo’s independence were supervised by an International Civilian Office (ICO) created by the Ahtisaari plan. On 10 September 2012, the ICO and international “supervision” end, leaving the Pristina government with full responsibility for the young country. This is a crucial time for Kosovo’s relations with its Serb population and Serbia; the Ahtisaari plan still provides the best model to guarantee peaceful co-existence.

Many Serbs in Kosovo cooperate with state institutions in order to protect their rights and interests, but those in the North remain intransigent. The government has written most of the Ahtisaari plan into its constitution and laws, with generous provisions for Kosovo Serbs, though implementation is sometimes unsatisfactory. It has devolved powers to municipalities, allowing not only Serbs but also the majority Albanians greater say in how they run local affairs. Nevertheless, many in Pristina are starting to question what they see as the preferential treatment given to Serbs. Communication is getting harder, as few young people speak the other’s language. After years with only a small number of inter-ethnic incidents, attacks on Serbs are becoming more frequent.

Serbia does not feel bound by the Ahtisaari plan and thus maintains a significant presence in Kosovo that increased after independence in 2008, when Belgrade was intent on showing that it retained some control over its co-nation­als. In northern Kosovo, Belgrade’s control over local administration is almost complete. In the south, it mainly pays many Serbs’ salaries and pensions and runs education and health systems without informing Pristina. The Kosovo government tolerates this but could attempt to close the Belgrade-based institutions in the south. Such a crackdown would probably cause many Serbs to leave quickly. When it agreed to the Ahtisaari plan, Kosovo accepted that Serbia would stay involved on its territory, though in a cooperative and transparent way. Belgrade has rejected this cooperation, however, and Kosovo is showing signs of impatience. If it will not accept the letter of the Ahtisaari plan, Belgrade needs to act in its spirit or risk losing what influence it still has in the south.

A decade ago, two thirds of Kosovo’s Serbs lived south of the Ibar, scattered among an overwhelmingly Albanian population, one third in the heavily Serb North. That north-south Serb balance has shifted toward parity, and the southern Serb population is rural, aging and politically passive. Its pool of educated, politically savvy individuals is tiny and out of proportion to the large role assigned the community in the Ahtisaari plan, especially as the Serbs in northern municipalities refuse to participate. They and other minorities depend wholly on privileges, including quotas; they do not have enough votes to win legislative seats in open competition. Their minority delegates in the Assembly seldom resist Albanian policy preferences. Serb delegates allowed the government to gut the Ahtisaari promise of an “independent Serbian language television channel”, for example, replacing it with a Serbian channel controlled by the state broadcaster.

The creation of six Serb-majority municipalities south of the Ibar has, nevertheless, largely succeeded; they have taken over most of the governing role from parallel structures financed by Serbia, even though education and health care remains under Belgrade’s control. The bigger municipalities like Gračanica and Štrpce have active assemblies, are implementing infrastructure development projects with foreign and Kosovo government funding and are taking on responsibilities in a wide range of areas. Other new municipalities are small, lack competent staff and struggle to raise the resources they need. But all municipalities in Kosovo are competing for limited public and private funds. Central authorities have a tendency to micromanage their spending and deprive them of means to raise money. Few municipal governments, Serb and Albanian alike, have the trained staff needed to exercise their devolved powers effectively, and they seldom cooperate with each other even in areas of mutual interest.

Pristina and its international partners have failed almost completely to overcome still strong resistance to the return of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs). Many of these are content to sell their property and resettle elsewhere, but stymied by corruption, intimidation and courts without Serbian language facilities cannot achieve even that modest goal. Even the Serbian Orthodox Church struggles to realise the property rights it has under the Ahtisaari plan. Serbs living in enclaves within Albanian-majority municipalities are increasingly vulnerable and in need of protection. Some villages in Serb-majority municipalities are also exposed to attacks from larger neighbouring Albanian settlements, usually motivated by conflict over land. Their security is Pristina’s responsibility, and the government must take effective measures to protect vulnerable minorities and their return.

The greatest obstacle facing the Serb community, and the serious threat to the Ahtisaari plan, may be the sheer difficulty of making a safe and sustainable living in minority areas. Mistrust, lack of proper registration and outright hostility all make it hard for minority-owned businesses to market goods and services to the majority. As there is little to do beyond farming in most Serb-majority municipalities, many Serbs depend on salaries from Belgrade. If these end, many educated Serbs will be tempted to leave. Education is another sensitive area, and parents who do not trust the local schools will not stay. The Serbian schools and hospitals should be allowed to continue, but Belgrade and Pristina need to negotiate a mechanism for their registration and oversight.

Pristina and Belgrade have an interest to cooperate and avoid an exodus of Kosovo’s Serbs that would leave Kosovo with a multi-ethnic constitution ill-matched to a mono-ethnic reality, creating fresh tensions for the region and undermining its image among its international supporters. Serbia could ill afford another wave of migrants in a difficult economic environment. Pristina faces a hard struggle extending its authority north of the Ibar and must show that Serbs can have a good life in independent Kosovo if it is to do so. If Pristina and Belgrade wish, as they should – even out of different motivations – that Kosovo be genuinely multi-ethnic, they must cooperate in support of its Serb community.

RECOMMENDATIONS

To the Government of Kosovo:

1.  Honour the Ahtisaari plan fully after the end of supervised independence.

2.  Respect provisions for both reserved and guaranteed Assembly seats for minorities in the next general elections, and thereafter implement an alternative incentive mechanism to boost minority voting.

3.  Do more to implement fully the plan’s requirement to “promote and facilitate the safe and dignified return of refugees and displaced persons and assist them in recovering their property”.

4.  Do more to stop violence, intimidation, usurpation and harassment of Serbs and returnees in Albanian-majority areas by, for example, establishing police substations and conducting frequent patrols in minority areas with a history of violence and intimidation.

5.  Respect the status of Serbian as an official language of Kosovo and ensure Serbs can access all official services in it, including the court system.

6.  Create an independent Serbian language television channel with its own editorial policy, board and director named by parliamentarians and municipal officials representing the Serb community.

7.  Support the development of municipal autonomy and self-governance by providing block grants with few ear­marks or conditions and encouraging local revenue collection, through changes in laws and procedures that increase local control over privatisation, publicly-owned enterprises and provision of local services and utilities.

To the Government of Serbia:

8.  Close the parallel Serb municipal government structures in southern Kosovo and replace them with transparent community liaison offices to provide for the needs of Kosovo Serbs.

9.  Do not discourage Serbs in Kosovo from cooperating with Kosovo institutions at all levels; continue to provide technical and financial assistance, but through open and transparent mechanisms.

To the Governments of Serbia and Kosovo:

10.  Establish a channel for direct communication to work out agreements on registration and licensing of Serb schools, health care providers and businesses in Kosovo, and to foster other forms of cooperation at the municipal level to avoid corruption, duplication and waste of limited resources.

11.  Ensure school certificates and diplomas are transferrable between Kosovo Serb/Serbian schools and Kosovo Albanian schools and that Serb schools in Kosovo offer Albanian as a second language.

To the International Steering Group and the European Union:

12.  Continue regular International Steering Group (ISG) meetings after the end of supervised independence to coordinate monitoring of implementation of the Ahti­saari plan and possible future Kosovo-Serb agreements.

13.  Transfer staff from the International Civilian Office (ICO) to the European Union Office in Kosovo to monitor implementation of the Ahtisaari plan, with a focus on decentralisation and communication with minority and religious leaders.

Pristina/Istanbul/Brussels, 10 September 2012

 
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