Haiti

A disastrous earthquake hit Haiti in 2010, leaving the country in deep distress. Reconstruction failed to address the systemic problems underlying its extreme socio-economic inequality and endemic political and gang violence. Following the COVID-19 pandemic, the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse in July 2021 and a bout of natural disasters soon thereafter, Haiti’s humanitarian plight has gone from bad to worse. Crisis Group aims to shed light on the sources of Haiti’s strife and supports core reforms to the security sector and state that could pave the way for credible elections, improved security and clean government.

CrisisWatch Haiti

Unchanged Situation

Kenya-led multinational security mission began arriving in Haiti to help quell surging gang violence, while PM Conille assumed office and formed new govt.

First personnel from Kenya-led security mission landed in Haiti. First wave of police officers from much-anticipated foreign security mission 25 June arrived in Haiti. Mission faces enormous task of helping a police force riddled with corruption stem rampant gang violence while ensuring protection of civilians in urban warfare. Earlier, human rights group Amnesty International 4 June expressed concern about lack of transparency on measures taken to ensure respect for human rights during operations and called for all safeguards to be implemented, including transparent complaint mechanisms for timely investigations into allegations of misconduct.

Gang violence continued as police chief stepped down. Gang alliance known as Viv Ansanm launched more attacks, though scaled back violence in days before mission arrived. Notably, gang members 9 June murdered three police officers in Delmas commune of capital Port-au-Prince after their armoured vehicle fell into ditch dug by gangs. Gang violence also affected parts of Artibonite department, Haiti’s breadbasket. Notably, Ti Bwadom gang attacks 14-15 June in Terre-Neuve and Lagon communes killed around twelve people. Viv Ansanm’s self-appointed spokesperson Jimmy ‘Barbecue’ Chérizier 23 June urged PM Conille to refrain from conducting operations against gangs and instead to engage in dialogue; Conille 25 June responded, saying gangs must lay down their arms and recognise state authority. International Organization for Migration 18 June reported 60% increase in displacement since March. Meanwhile, police high command 14 June dismissed its director Frantz Elbé, replacing him 19 June with Normil Rameau, former police director under President Moïse. 

PM Conille assumed office and appointed new govt. Garry Conille was officially installed as prime minister 3 June; one week later, official gazette 11 June published names of fourteen new cabinet members. All members of Transitional Presidential Council reportedly participated in appointment of ministers while Conille selected heads of five most important ministries. Conille 12 June promised govt would prioritise fight against corruption in order to restore Haitians’ confidence in their leaders and institutions.

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In The News

24 mei 2024
The gangs have never controlled so much territory in Haiti. They [now] have … established strongholds in areas the police have not been able to access. The Guardian
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Diego Da Rin

Analyst, Haiti and Central America
19 apr 2024
If [the Haitian gangs] continue to blockade the ports and the capital’s airport, the lack of supplies and food could seriously worsen the humanitarian crisis. The Guardian
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Diego Da Rin

Analyst, Haiti and Central America
30 mrt 2024
Countries should implement all necessary measures to curb the illegal arms to Haiti, including inspections at their own ports within their own borders. The Hill
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Diego Da Rin

Analyst, Haiti and Central America
5 mrt 2024
The situation [in Haiti] is an emergency … If the gangs continue with these large-scale attacks, they could control all of the capital in a matter of days or weeks. The Guardian
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Diego Da Rin

Analyst, Haiti and Central America
4 mrt 2024
The gangs are showing they can bring Haiti to its feet whenever they want. The Guardian
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Diego Da Rin

Analyst, Haiti and Central America

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Diego Da Rin

Diego Da Rin

Analyst, Haiti and Central America

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