Haiti

A disastrous earthquake hit Haiti in 2010, leaving the country in deep distress. Reconstruction failed to address the systemic problems underlying its extreme socio-economic inequality and endemic political and gang violence. Following the COVID-19 pandemic, the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse in July 2021 and a bout of natural disasters soon thereafter, Haiti’s humanitarian plight has gone from bad to worse. Crisis Group aims to shed light on the sources of Haiti’s strife and supports core reforms to the security sector and state that could pave the way for credible elections, improved security and clean government.

CrisisWatch Haiti

Unchanged Situation

Transitional council was sworn in after lengthy negotiations, gang offensive continued amid deteriorating humanitarian crisis, and deployment of multinational security mission remained uncertain.

Transitional council sworn in, Edgard Leblanc selected to head body. After weeks of negotiations, cabinet of outgoing PM Henry 12, 16 April published two documents formalising creation of transitional presidential council and naming its seven voting members and two non-voting observers. Henry 24 April resigned; Council was sworn in next day with heavy police protection, 30 April it named former senate President Edgard Leblanc to head body. Four council members (forming majority bloc) same day proposed former sports minister Fritz Bélizaire as their candidate for prime minister, however, threatening new crisis as three remaining voting members accused their colleagues of violating procedures for designating PM. 

Gang offensive continued. Gang alliance known as Viv Ansanm continued their offensive, mostly in capital Port-au-Prince. Notably, gangs 1 April launched assault to seize control of national palace; gang members from Canaan gang 7 April demolished police station in Bon Repos neighbourhood; and armed attack 11 April in Cabaret town north of capital killed ten. Gangs also looted and burned down dozens of pharmacies, clinics, shops and private residences. Police conducted some successful counter-operations, 5 April seizing significant number of weapons and ammunition at Cap Haitian port, 6 April recovering ship carrying rice that gangs had hijacked two days before. Self-defence groups stepped-up activities, pushing back gangs from several neighbourhoods in capital and beyond. 

Violence aggravated humanitarian crisis. Notably, International Organization for Migration 9 April reported some 95,000 people had fled capital since early March; World Food Program 11 April warned its food stocks could run out by end of April; and head of UN children’s agency 22 April said essential services had collapsed in many areas.

Deployment of multinational security mission remained uncertain. Kenyan President Ruto 25 April welcomed swearing-in of council as “a crucial step in the political transition of Haiti” and reiterated Kenya’s readiness to send security mission, though start date still unknown. Earlier, eight private sector organisations in Haiti 15 April sent letter to Ruto expressing concern about delays to mission and called for its rapid deployment. 

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In The News

24 тра 2024
The gangs have never controlled so much territory in Haiti. They [now] have … established strongholds in areas the police have not been able to access. The Guardian
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Diego Da Rin

Consultant, Latin America and Caribbean
19 кві 2024
If [the Haitian gangs] continue to blockade the ports and the capital’s airport, the lack of supplies and food could seriously worsen the humanitarian crisis. The Guardian
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Diego Da Rin

Consultant, Latin America and Caribbean
30 бер 2024
Countries should implement all necessary measures to curb the illegal arms to Haiti, including inspections at their own ports within their own borders. The Hill
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Diego Da Rin

Consultant, Latin America and Caribbean
5 бер 2024
The situation [in Haiti] is an emergency … If the gangs continue with these large-scale attacks, they could control all of the capital in a matter of days or weeks. The Guardian
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Diego Da Rin

Consultant, Latin America and Caribbean
4 бер 2024
The gangs are showing they can bring Haiti to its feet whenever they want. The Guardian
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Diego Da Rin

Consultant, Latin America and Caribbean

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Diego Da Rin

Diego Da Rin

Consultant, Latin America and Caribbean

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