icon caret Arrow Down Arrow Left Arrow Right Arrow Up Line Camera icon set icon set Ellipsis icon set Facebook Favorite Globe Hamburger List Mail Map Marker Map Microphone Minus PDF Play Print RSS Search Share Trash Crisiswatch Alerts and Trends Box - 1080/761 Copy Twitter Video Camera  copyview Whatsapp Youtube
Somalia: Why is Al-Shabaab Still A Potent Threat?
Somalia: Why is Al-Shabaab Still A Potent Threat?
« Au Niger, l’option militaire face à l’Etat islamique doit s’accompagner d’un projet politique »
« Au Niger, l’option militaire face à l’Etat islamique doit s’accompagner d’un projet politique »
Young fighters from Al-Shabab come together to count their bullets at a frontline section in Sinaya Neighborhood in Mogadishu, on 13 July 2009. AFP/Mohamed Dahir
Commentary / Africa

Somalia: Why is Al-Shabaab Still A Potent Threat?

This year, the armed Islamist extremist group Al-Shabaab has notched up a series of bloody successes against both Somali targets and the African Union peace-enforcement mission AMISOM. Meanwhile, the international community has been busy cajoling principals of the Somali federal and state governments into agreeing on the means by which to hold new elections due in August. Despite four years of “post-transitional” government and a level of international engagement and foreign military presence not seen since the early 1990s, Somali politics remain dysfunctional and prone to violent disagreement – exactly the conditions in which Al-Shabaab thrives.

Al-Shabaab’s recent string of high-profile attacks began on 15 January, when it overran an AMISOM forward operating base manned by a company-sized Kenyan contingent in El-Adde, in the Gedo region, inflicting heavy casualties (estimates upwards of 50 dead with additional hostages taken); the Kenyan military has not provided details. On 21 January, Al-Shabaab hit Mogadishu’s popular Lido beach area, a symbol of the city’s return to normalcy, killing at least twenty civilians. On 2 February, a bomb blew a hole in the side of a Somali-owned Daallo Airlines plane minutes after take-off. The attack killed only the suspected suicide bomber and the plane was able to land safely, however this was the first time Al-Shabaab – who have not yet claimed the attack – has attempted to bring down an aircraft with an on-board device. Lastly, from 5-8 February, the group temporarily re-occupied the centre of Marka, in the Lower Shabelle region, which it lost to AMISOM and Somali National Army forces in August 2012, after Somali troops withdrew due to lack of pay.

Somalis’s southern interim federal states and regions. CRISIS GROUP

In late January, following the Kenyan contingent’s losses at El-Adde, Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta spoke at the African Union’s Peace and Security Council to call for a review of AMISOM’s mandate and put forward a five-point plan for its expansion. AMISOM troop-contributing countries met in Nairobi on 8 February, and another summit is planned for late February in Djibouti to agree a new approach.

AMISOM’s vulnerabilities ultimately stem from the lack of a political settlement in Somalia.

Whatever the failings and remedies to be identified, the mission’s vulnerabilities ultimately stem from the lack of a political settlement in Somalia. AMISOM is again being forced to up the military ante, in response to Al-Shabaab’s tactical switch to guerrilla-style attacks. Its rural insurgency has exposed AMISOM’s territorial overstretch after a previous expanded mandate allowed the large-scale Operation Eagle and Operation Indian Ocean, which both began in 2014. These offensives resulted in the “liberation” of much of south central Somalia, which in certain areas has looked more like “occupation” by outsiders. In addition to the longstanding problem of Somalia’s neighbours as troop contributing countries, the interim federal administrations and the Somali National Army that followed in AMISOM’s wake are still largely clan-based, and locally identified as such. The two recent AMISOM reversals took place in Gedo and Lower Shabelle, both of which were subsumed into the new Interim Juba Administration and Interim South West State of Somalia, respectively, and are still disputed by or between local populations.

A combination of factors accounts for the success of Al-Shabaab’s El-Adde attack: blunders and conspiracy can be applied in equal measure. But most importantly, Al-Shabaab has not been defeated politically and socially in the south-western region of Gedo. To simplify a many-layered context, local communities, belonging predominantly to the Marehan-Darod clan, are caught between an Interim Juba Administration which they did not fight for and which is led by a rival clan based in distant Kismayo; Kenyan and Ethiopian AMISOM contingents who have different priorities and local clients; and a federal government that can’t project beyond its mostly Hawiye-clan heartlands. The El-Adde communities have little reason to intercept Al-Shabaab sympathisers and fighters, let alone confront them militarily.

The situation in Lower Shabelle that allowed Al-Shabaab to take control of the centre of Marka has its own specific dynamics, but again local communities are caught between various conflicting forces. The Interim South West State of Somalia was disputed from the start in Marka and environs, and did not resolve the competition between the most powerful clans, namely Habr Gedir-Hawiye and Bimal-Dir, who at different times have found it politically advantageous to fight for and with Al-Shabaab, the Somali National Army and AMISOM.

The competition of interests provides space for Al-Shabaab…

These competing interests leave the ground clear for Al-Shabaab’s overarching narrative of one Islamic system that claims to put the Somali faithful first. The group often styles itself as a mediator in local conflicts, where international, regional and Somali forces are frequently seen as partisan. The competition also provides space for Al-Shabaab to deal with its own internal rivalries and appear resilient. In the past couple of years, the group suffered and survived not only territorial losses but also a bitter internal leadership battle in July 2013, a U.S. drone strike killing its long-term emir Ahmed Abdi Godane in September 2014, and most recently a challenge from factions who wanted to transfer official allegiance from al-Qaeda to the Islamic State.

As Crisis Group recommended in its June 2014 briefing, Al-Shabaab: It Will Be a Long War, more military pressure can only sustain progress within durable political settlements. To achieve this, more systematic efforts and support should be given to parallel national and local reconciliation processes at all levels of Somali society. The paramount focus should be on addressing local Somali political grievances, not on regional or international priorities. Tapping into the grievances of local communities is what enables Al-Shabaab to remain and rebuild in Somalia.

Contributors

Former Project Director, Horn of Africa
Former Research Assistant, Horn of Africa
Op-Ed / Africa

« Au Niger, l’option militaire face à l’Etat islamique doit s’accompagner d’un projet politique »

Originally published in Le Monde

L’analyste Hannah Armstrong regrette que Niamey délaisse le dialogue avec les communautés frontalières de la région de Tillabéri, notamment les nomades peuls.

Le Niger est depuis des années l’Etat du Sahel central le plus résilient face aux insurrections menées par l’Etat islamique (EI) et Al-Qaïda. Cela n’a pas empêché les forces nigériennes de subir les attaques les plus meurtrières de leur histoire en décembre et janvier derniers. Ces deux attaques, qui ont fait plus de 150 morts, ont mis en lumière la manière dont la branche sahélienne de l’EI, particulièrement active entre le Mali et la région nigérienne de Tillabéri, s’est renforcée en exploitant le fossé grandissant entre le gouvernement et les communautés locales. Elles ont également amorcé un brusque changement de cap : l’Etat nigérien privilégie de nouveau le volet militaire, délaissant la politique de dialogue avec les communautés frontalières de la région de Tillabéri initiée mi-2018 afin de regagner leur confiance.

Quelques jours après la seconde attaque, les dirigeants des pays membres du G5 Sahel et de la France, réunis en sommet à Pau le 13 janvier, ont d’ailleurs appelé à un renforcement de l’action militaire en vue de défaire les groupes djihadistes, et plus particulièrement l’EI dans la zone du Liptako-Gourma, qui s’étend aux frontières du Mali, du Niger et du Burkina Faso et comprend la région de Tillabéri. Ils ont certes souligné l’importance des efforts de développement et de meilleure gouvernance, mais sur le terrain, le volet militaire prédomine en dépit des répercussions sur les communautés.

L’offensive de «Barkhane» et des forces du G5 Sahel pourrait réactiver des conflits communautaires.

En effet, l’offensive de « Barkhane » et des forces du G5 Sahel pourrait réactiver des conflits communautaires que l’EI sait parfaitement exploiter en se présentant comme un protecteur des communautés et une alternative à un Etat incapable de répondre aux griefs des populations frontalières, qu’il s’agisse des tensions autour de l’accès aux ressources foncières ou de la sous-représentation des nomades peuls au sein des forces de sécurité. Par ailleurs, les allégations d’abus commis par les forces de sécurité contre les civils sont en forte hausse depuis le début de la contre-offensive et font le lit du recrutement de nouveaux djihadistes. En parallèle d’une action militaire qui reste nécessaire, l’Etat devrait redoubler d’efforts politiques pour rétablir la paix entre et au sein des communautés, et surtout renouer des liens forts avec elles.

Tensions intercommunautaires

Au Niger, un document ayant filtré début avril recensait 102 civils portés disparus, des hommes issus de communautés nomades dont on soupçonne qu’ils ont été tués par l’armée nigérienne. Le ministre de la défense, Issoufou Katambe, a promis qu’une enquête permettra de disculper l’armée, mais sur le terrain le fossé continue de se creuser entre les communautés nomades et l’Etat. Le 30 avril, un rapport de la mission des Nations unies au Mali, la Minusma, a rapporté pour la période janvier-mars une augmentation de 61 % du nombre de violations des droits humains, dont 34 exécutions extrajudiciaires menées par l’armée nigérienne opérant au Mali.

Déjà, en 2017 et 2018, lors de la dernière offensive militaire d’ampleur dans la région frontalière, le Niger et l’opération « Barkhane » s’étaient alliés à des milices ethniques maliennes rivales d’autres communautés, des nomades peuls en particulier. Les offensives des milices maliennes ont d’abord semblé affaiblir l’EI dans la région de Tillabéri, mais elles ont ravivé les tensions intercommunautaires et causé le décès de nombreux civils. Cela a poussé de nombreux habitants de la région à rejoindre les rangs de l’EI et un nombre croissant de communautés, bien au-delà des seuls Peuls, à accepter la présence des militants djihadistes comme un moindre mal. Dès que l’étreinte militaire de « Barkhane » et des milices s’est relâchée, en 2019, l’EI est donc revenu plus fort que jamais.

En 2018 comme aujourd’hui, l’option militaire n’apporte à l’Etat que des succès à court terme s’il ne s’accompagne pas d’un véritable projet politique pour consolider ces acquis. Le Niger devrait le savoir, après avoir déjà emprunté une voie plus politique pour sortir des insurrections touareg des années 1990-2000. Les opérations militaires restent une composante essentielle de la résolution de la crise sécuritaire, mais la réponse politique dans la région de Tillabéri doit prendre les devants. Afin d’endiguer la montée en puissance de l’EI, le Niger – avec le soutien de ses partenaires étrangers – devrait commencer par reconnaître ses propres responsabilités dans la marginalisation des communautés frontalières et proposer un plan ambitieux pour répondre à leurs griefs.

l’EI ne représente pas qu’une menace sécuritaire, il constitue également une véritable alternative à l’Etat en matière de gouvernance.

Pour y parvenir, le Niger a des atouts à faire valoir. Contrairement au Mali et au Burkina Faso, il n’a pas eu recours à des milices ethniques et groupes de vigilance issus de ses propres communautés pour combattre les djihadistes, une mesure qui aurait exacerbé les tensions entre celles-ci. Le Niger a en outre déjà prouvé, par le passé, être capable d’intégrer des représentants de certaines communautés nomades à des hauts postes au sein de l’Etat central et des institutions sécuritaires. Enfin, Niamey peut s’appuyer sur des institutions telles que la Haute Autorité pour la consolidation de la paix (HACP), qui, si elle est bien utilisée, peut coordonner les actions de l’Etat et mener des actions rapides, par exemple pour apaiser les relations entre forces de sécurité et civils dans les régions frontalières.

Protection des civils et du bétail

Les précédentes tentatives de dialogue avec les communautés de Tillabéri ont bien enregistré quelques maigres progrès, mais elles ont souvent souffert de la primauté des actions militaires. Et même lorsque le dialogue était l’option privilégiée, il a été miné par un manque de coordination et de consensus au sein des cercles du pouvoir central. Le gouvernement nigérien devrait donner la priorité au dialogue avec les nomades peuls, groupe le plus marginalisé, tout en facilitant des accords entre et au sein des différentes communautés. Niamey devrait également développer des solutions pour résoudre la compétition autour des ressources foncières et du bétail, qui nourrit la plupart des conflits entre communautés dans la région.

S’il est difficile à envisager dans le contexte actuel, le dialogue avec les djihadistes devrait être également relancé. Il peut susciter des défections au sein de l’EI, y compris de commandants issus des communautés frontalières. L’Etat devra opérer avec prudence pour éviter des représailles des djihadistes contre ceux qui coopèrent avec les autorités. Afin de redorer son image auprès des communautés de la région de Tillabéri, Niamey pourrait par ailleurs demander à ses forces de sécurité de ne pas se consacrer exclusivement aux opérations contre-terroristes et les assigner à la protection des civils et du bétail. Parallèlement, les autorités pourraient assouplir les mesures qui limitent les mouvements de population ou l’activité des marchés, imposées pour des raisons de sécurité mais qui affaiblissent l’économie de Tillabéri et compliquent les liens entre l’Etat et les communautés de la région.

Au Niger, l’EI ne représente pas qu’une menace sécuritaire, il constitue également aux yeux des communautés frontalières une véritable alternative à l’Etat en matière de gouvernance. Il convient donc de lui apporter une réponse sur ces deux fronts, sécuritaire et politique.