icon caret Arrow Down Arrow Left Arrow Right Arrow Up Line Camera icon set icon set Ellipsis icon set Facebook Favorite Globe Hamburger List Mail Map Marker Map Microphone Minus PDF Play Print RSS Search Share Trash Crisiswatch Alerts and Trends Box - 1080/761 Copy Twitter Video Camera  copyview Whatsapp Youtube
Nigeria's elections promise a genuine contest – but avoiding unrest is vital
Nigeria's elections promise a genuine contest – but avoiding unrest is vital
« Au Niger, l’option militaire face à l’Etat islamique doit s’accompagner d’un projet politique »
« Au Niger, l’option militaire face à l’Etat islamique doit s’accompagner d’un projet politique »
Op-Ed / Africa

Nigeria's elections promise a genuine contest – but avoiding unrest is vital

Originally published in The Guardian

With less than a month to go before contentious polls, Nigeria is facing a perfect storm. Elections on 14 and 28 February are not only about choosing a new president and political representatives; they also constitute a critical test for Nigeria’s unity, particularly after five years of insurgency by the radical Islamist group Boko Haram.

A public pledge for a peaceful election and the avoidance of violence after the polls has been signed by the seven presidential candidates, including the two front-runners: President Goodluck Jonathan and the former head of state,Muhammadu Buhari. It is certainly a positive first step, but it will be seriously undermined without full support and respect on the ground.

Past elections have been violent, but the February polls could be particularly destabilising because they mark the first nationwide contest in decades between two relatively equal political parties – the People’s Democratic Party (PDP), which has held the presidency and most state governments since the return to democratic rule in 1999, and the All Progressives Congress (APC), a merger of the four largest opposition parties.

This genuine contest is a sign of progress. But the acrimony between the parties, aggravated by regional and religious claims of entitlement to the presidency, has created a volatile environment. Jonathan is a Christian from the south, while Buhari is a Muslim from the north.

Violence intensified in January, and included a gun attack on seven opposition members, allegedly by PDP agents. In northern Kano state, PDP supporters have been unable to campaign for fear of lynch mobs. Jonathan’s campaign bus was attacked and burned in Jos, Plateau state. Supporters of both candidates have threatened violence if they feel their man has been cheated.

Boko Haram’s attacks make the vote still more hazardous. The insurgents are hampering the work of the independent national electoral commission (Inec) and have already forced it to halt elections in high-risk areas of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states. The insurgents may seize more communities – and more voters – before the polls.

At the time of writing, the electoral commission is still struggling to get permanent voter cards to more than 15 million registered voters (about 22% of the electorate). It has asked voters to collect them instead, which for many will necessitate an arduous journey. Despite a senate resolution, in December, ordering Inec to make provisions that would enable internally displaced persons to vote – a move that would allow probably in excess of one million to participate in the election – this has not yet happened.

As most displaced persons are from areas that traditionally support the opposition, this could disproportionately affect the APC, increasing the likelihood of the final results being disputed.

Pro-PDP bias in security agencies also heightens tensions, raising doubts about how they will deal with potential post-election violence. The security services’ inadequacies have been exposed by Boko Haram, leaving many citizens to wonder if they will actually be safe at the polling stations. The police are dysfunctional and have suffered immense retaliation at the hand of insurgents, and the army is reeling from casualties, corruption and mismanagement.

Four key steps must be taken to lower the political temperature.

First, political parties and the presidential candidates, who bear the primary responsibility for preventing violence, need to tone down their rhetoric and hold their supporters accountable. In the event of contested results, aggrieved parties must turn to the courts, rather than to violence or unconstitutional arrangements.

Second, Jonathan and his military chiefs must contain Boko Haram while avoiding heavy-handed tactics that alienate northern regions. As the governors of the three most affected states have demanded, the federal government should urgently deploy more troops and intelligence personnel both to repel Boko Haram and to protect voters. Boko Haram’s recent attack on Baga, a village on the border with Chad, shows the government must enhance its cooperation with neighbouring countries to stem cross-border operations.

Third, the electoral commission must act quickly to ensure that millions of voters are not disenfranchised. When it is unable to deliver new voter cards, it should allow voters to use their old ones.

Fourth, institutions overseeing security agencies and monitoring respect for citizens’ rights, including the police service commission, national human rights commission and relevant committees of the federal parliament, should publicly condemn partisan acts and other excesses by security agencies.

Nigeria’s religious, civic and media leaders have a critical role in urging politicians to take these steps to limit the risk of widespread violence. Nigerians cannot afford to continue with politics as usual; it is ruining their country.

Op-Ed / Africa

« Au Niger, l’option militaire face à l’Etat islamique doit s’accompagner d’un projet politique »

Originally published in Le Monde

L’analyste Hannah Armstrong regrette que Niamey délaisse le dialogue avec les communautés frontalières de la région de Tillabéri, notamment les nomades peuls.

Le Niger est depuis des années l’Etat du Sahel central le plus résilient face aux insurrections menées par l’Etat islamique (EI) et Al-Qaïda. Cela n’a pas empêché les forces nigériennes de subir les attaques les plus meurtrières de leur histoire en décembre et janvier derniers. Ces deux attaques, qui ont fait plus de 150 morts, ont mis en lumière la manière dont la branche sahélienne de l’EI, particulièrement active entre le Mali et la région nigérienne de Tillabéri, s’est renforcée en exploitant le fossé grandissant entre le gouvernement et les communautés locales. Elles ont également amorcé un brusque changement de cap : l’Etat nigérien privilégie de nouveau le volet militaire, délaissant la politique de dialogue avec les communautés frontalières de la région de Tillabéri initiée mi-2018 afin de regagner leur confiance.

Quelques jours après la seconde attaque, les dirigeants des pays membres du G5 Sahel et de la France, réunis en sommet à Pau le 13 janvier, ont d’ailleurs appelé à un renforcement de l’action militaire en vue de défaire les groupes djihadistes, et plus particulièrement l’EI dans la zone du Liptako-Gourma, qui s’étend aux frontières du Mali, du Niger et du Burkina Faso et comprend la région de Tillabéri. Ils ont certes souligné l’importance des efforts de développement et de meilleure gouvernance, mais sur le terrain, le volet militaire prédomine en dépit des répercussions sur les communautés.

L’offensive de «Barkhane» et des forces du G5 Sahel pourrait réactiver des conflits communautaires.

En effet, l’offensive de « Barkhane » et des forces du G5 Sahel pourrait réactiver des conflits communautaires que l’EI sait parfaitement exploiter en se présentant comme un protecteur des communautés et une alternative à un Etat incapable de répondre aux griefs des populations frontalières, qu’il s’agisse des tensions autour de l’accès aux ressources foncières ou de la sous-représentation des nomades peuls au sein des forces de sécurité. Par ailleurs, les allégations d’abus commis par les forces de sécurité contre les civils sont en forte hausse depuis le début de la contre-offensive et font le lit du recrutement de nouveaux djihadistes. En parallèle d’une action militaire qui reste nécessaire, l’Etat devrait redoubler d’efforts politiques pour rétablir la paix entre et au sein des communautés, et surtout renouer des liens forts avec elles.

Tensions intercommunautaires

Au Niger, un document ayant filtré début avril recensait 102 civils portés disparus, des hommes issus de communautés nomades dont on soupçonne qu’ils ont été tués par l’armée nigérienne. Le ministre de la défense, Issoufou Katambe, a promis qu’une enquête permettra de disculper l’armée, mais sur le terrain le fossé continue de se creuser entre les communautés nomades et l’Etat. Le 30 avril, un rapport de la mission des Nations unies au Mali, la Minusma, a rapporté pour la période janvier-mars une augmentation de 61 % du nombre de violations des droits humains, dont 34 exécutions extrajudiciaires menées par l’armée nigérienne opérant au Mali.

Déjà, en 2017 et 2018, lors de la dernière offensive militaire d’ampleur dans la région frontalière, le Niger et l’opération « Barkhane » s’étaient alliés à des milices ethniques maliennes rivales d’autres communautés, des nomades peuls en particulier. Les offensives des milices maliennes ont d’abord semblé affaiblir l’EI dans la région de Tillabéri, mais elles ont ravivé les tensions intercommunautaires et causé le décès de nombreux civils. Cela a poussé de nombreux habitants de la région à rejoindre les rangs de l’EI et un nombre croissant de communautés, bien au-delà des seuls Peuls, à accepter la présence des militants djihadistes comme un moindre mal. Dès que l’étreinte militaire de « Barkhane » et des milices s’est relâchée, en 2019, l’EI est donc revenu plus fort que jamais.

En 2018 comme aujourd’hui, l’option militaire n’apporte à l’Etat que des succès à court terme s’il ne s’accompagne pas d’un véritable projet politique pour consolider ces acquis. Le Niger devrait le savoir, après avoir déjà emprunté une voie plus politique pour sortir des insurrections touareg des années 1990-2000. Les opérations militaires restent une composante essentielle de la résolution de la crise sécuritaire, mais la réponse politique dans la région de Tillabéri doit prendre les devants. Afin d’endiguer la montée en puissance de l’EI, le Niger – avec le soutien de ses partenaires étrangers – devrait commencer par reconnaître ses propres responsabilités dans la marginalisation des communautés frontalières et proposer un plan ambitieux pour répondre à leurs griefs.

l’EI ne représente pas qu’une menace sécuritaire, il constitue également une véritable alternative à l’Etat en matière de gouvernance.

Pour y parvenir, le Niger a des atouts à faire valoir. Contrairement au Mali et au Burkina Faso, il n’a pas eu recours à des milices ethniques et groupes de vigilance issus de ses propres communautés pour combattre les djihadistes, une mesure qui aurait exacerbé les tensions entre celles-ci. Le Niger a en outre déjà prouvé, par le passé, être capable d’intégrer des représentants de certaines communautés nomades à des hauts postes au sein de l’Etat central et des institutions sécuritaires. Enfin, Niamey peut s’appuyer sur des institutions telles que la Haute Autorité pour la consolidation de la paix (HACP), qui, si elle est bien utilisée, peut coordonner les actions de l’Etat et mener des actions rapides, par exemple pour apaiser les relations entre forces de sécurité et civils dans les régions frontalières.

Protection des civils et du bétail

Les précédentes tentatives de dialogue avec les communautés de Tillabéri ont bien enregistré quelques maigres progrès, mais elles ont souvent souffert de la primauté des actions militaires. Et même lorsque le dialogue était l’option privilégiée, il a été miné par un manque de coordination et de consensus au sein des cercles du pouvoir central. Le gouvernement nigérien devrait donner la priorité au dialogue avec les nomades peuls, groupe le plus marginalisé, tout en facilitant des accords entre et au sein des différentes communautés. Niamey devrait également développer des solutions pour résoudre la compétition autour des ressources foncières et du bétail, qui nourrit la plupart des conflits entre communautés dans la région.

S’il est difficile à envisager dans le contexte actuel, le dialogue avec les djihadistes devrait être également relancé. Il peut susciter des défections au sein de l’EI, y compris de commandants issus des communautés frontalières. L’Etat devra opérer avec prudence pour éviter des représailles des djihadistes contre ceux qui coopèrent avec les autorités. Afin de redorer son image auprès des communautés de la région de Tillabéri, Niamey pourrait par ailleurs demander à ses forces de sécurité de ne pas se consacrer exclusivement aux opérations contre-terroristes et les assigner à la protection des civils et du bétail. Parallèlement, les autorités pourraient assouplir les mesures qui limitent les mouvements de population ou l’activité des marchés, imposées pour des raisons de sécurité mais qui affaiblissent l’économie de Tillabéri et compliquent les liens entre l’Etat et les communautés de la région.

Au Niger, l’EI ne représente pas qu’une menace sécuritaire, il constitue également aux yeux des communautés frontalières une véritable alternative à l’Etat en matière de gouvernance. Il convient donc de lui apporter une réponse sur ces deux fronts, sécuritaire et politique.