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How We Work

Independent. Impartial. Inclusive.

Our staff of 110 people, drawn from diplomacy, media, the academy and civil society, are based in advocacy centres and field offices around the world.

Learn more about our global operations

Our Methodology

Field Research
Sharp Analysis
High-level Advocacy
Learn more about our methodology

Crisis Group has more than twenty years of experience in working to prevent, manage and resolve deadly conflict.

Field research

Our expert analysts engage directly with all parties to a conflict as they conduct research on the ground, share multiple perspectives and propose practical policy solutions.

Sharp analysis

We publish comprehensive reports and timely commentaries to inform decision making and shape the public debate on how to limit threats to peace and security.

High-level advocacy

We work with heads of government, policymakers, media, civil society, and conflict actors themselves to sound the alarm of impending conflict and to open paths to peace.

In Darfur, for example, International Crisis Group was ringing the alarm bell … They gave us insight. We didn’t always agree with them. It’s not their role to come into agreement with us. It’s their role to reflect ground truth

General Colin Powell

Former U.S. Secretary of State

Global Operations

Global Operations

Latest Updates

Containing the Shock Waves from Venezuela

Venezuela’s socio-economic implosion is dragging in neighbours as hundreds of thousands of people flee the country, epidemics spread and violent crime spills over borders. International humanitarian support is needed and regional powers should push for a negotiated transition, including through threats of targeted sanctions.

Also available in Español

To Reunite Ukraine, Kyiv Must Overcome Its Own Prejudices

Four years after Russia’s invasion, psychological barriers are compounding the physical divisions of Ukraine. While many Ukrainians have turned to the West, millions of conflict-affected citizens are being excluded, creating new obstacles to any eventual reintegration of the country.

End the Weaponisation of Water in Central Asia

Four Central Asian states – Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan – have argued over their water resources since the collapse of the Soviet Union. At times these disputes have seemed to threaten war. The forthcoming presidential summit in Astana can help banish that spectre.