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How We Work

Independent. Impartial. Inclusive.

Our staff of 110 people, drawn from diplomacy, media, the academy and civil society, are based in advocacy centres and field offices around the world.

Learn more about our global operations

Our Methodology

Field Research
Sharp Analysis
High-level Advocacy
Learn more about our methodology

Crisis Group has more than twenty years of experience in working to prevent, manage and resolve deadly conflict.

Field research

Our expert analysts engage directly with all parties to a conflict as they conduct research on the ground, share multiple perspectives and propose practical policy solutions.

Sharp analysis

We publish comprehensive reports and timely commentaries to inform decision making and shape the public debate on how to limit threats to peace and security.

High-level advocacy

We work with heads of government, policymakers, media, civil society, and conflict actors themselves to sound the alarm of impending conflict and to open paths to peace.

In Darfur, for example, International Crisis Group was ringing the alarm bell … They gave us insight. We didn’t always agree with them. It’s not their role to come into agreement with us. It’s their role to reflect ground truth

General Colin Powell

Former U.S. Secretary of State

Global Operations

Global Operations

Upcoming Events

19
Events
October 2017

The Widening Gulf: Saudi-Iran Confrontation in the Trump Era

International Crisis Group, Foreign Affairs and the Arabia Foundation are partnering to host a conference to examine how the longstanding confrontation between Iran and Saudi Arabia may evolve under the Trump administration.

Council on Foreign Relations, New York
20
Events
November 2017

Europe and its Neighbourhood 2017 – Conflict Prevention and Crisis Management in the 21st Century

The third annual conference on Europe and its Neighbourhood, organised in partnership with Chatham House and Al Sharq Forum, will assess how countries across Europe and in its environs can address issues of common concern – security threats, current and emerging conflicts, migration and societal challenges – amidst a volatile and uncertain global order.

Royal Society of Arts, London

Latest Updates

Op-Ed / Europe & Central Asia

Rare summit meeting on Nagorno-Karabakh peace

A rare meeting between the presidents of Armenia and Azerbaijan on 16 October 2017 could lead to a breakthrough. But the two countries have very different ideas on how to reconcile their competing narratives and goals in the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict.

Originally published in JAM News

Also available in Հայերեն, Русский

Saving the Iran Nuclear Deal, Despite Trump's Decertification

President Trump’s decertification of the Iran nuclear deal is a blow to this multi-national accord, but need not be fatal. The U.S. Congress, Iran and the European co-signatories can still do much to save one of the great diplomatic achievements of the past decade.

Also available in فارسی
Report / Africa

The Social Roots of Jihadist Violence in Burkina Faso’s North

Jihadist violence in the West African Sahel has now spread to the north of Burkina Faso. The response of Ouagadougou and its partners must go beyond the obvious religious and security dimensions of the crisis, and any solution must take into account deep-rooted social and local factors.

Also available in Français

Discord in Yemen’s North Could Be a Chance for Peace

Since August, a public rift has surfaced between the two main partners on the northern front of Yemen’s war – the forces loyal to the Huthis and Ali Abdullah Saleh. Rather than fostering its rivals’ discord, key powerbroker Saudi Arabia should seize this rare chance to resolve the two-and-a-half year war by championing a new regional initiative.

Also available in العربية

The Domestic Challenge to Kyrgyzstan’s Milestone Election

While Kyrgyzstan’s 15 October elections are a rare milestone for Central Asian democracy, the campaign is exposing dangerous fault lines. In the largest city of Osh, the new president will have to face down robust local power brokers, defuse Uzbek-Kyrgyz tensions and re-introduce the rule of law.