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April Longley Alley

Project Director, Gulf and Arabian Peninsula

April Longley Alley has conducted fieldwork in Yemen since 2004. She works with other members of the Middle East program to research and produce reports on security, conflict, political, governance, human rights and social issues related to the Arabian Peninsula with a particular focus on Yemen.

Areas of Expertise

  • Comparative politics of the Middle East
  • Yemen

Professional Background

  • M.A. in Arab studies and a Ph.D. in government from Georgetown University
  • Former Fulbright fellow.

Select Publications

She has written extensively on Yemen for a variety of publications including Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, PS: Political Science and Politics, The Middle East Journal, The Journal of Democracy, and The National.

Languages

  • English 
  • Arabic

In The News

14 Dec 2017
Most people agree at this point that the Saudis are facing a legitimate security threat and that Iran is part of the problem. By continuing down this road, things will just get worse. The Washington Post

April Longley Alley

Project Director, Gulf and Arabian Peninsula
12 Dec 2017
[Yemen's coalition] policy of trying to split the Houthi-Saleh alliance has backfired dramatically. The Times

April Longley Alley

Project Director, Gulf and Arabian Peninsula
4 Dec 2017
[The death of Yemen's President] Saleh in this way is more than likely going to bring more pain for Yemen. If Saudi Arabia wanted a negotiated exit, that opportunity seems lost for now. The New York Times

April Longley Alley

Project Director, Gulf and Arabian Peninsula
4 Dec 2017
[Former Yemen's President Saleh] was an expert at co-optation, divide-and-rule politics and managed chaos. He was able to gradually consolidate power over time by including these powerful constituencies in networks of patronage and privilege. The Washington Post

April Longley Alley

Project Director, Gulf and Arabian Peninsula
4 Dec 2017
Whatever happens with the current fight in Sanaa, a durable solution to the Yemen's conflict must be a negotiated one that provides a political place and security for all sides. AFP

April Longley Alley

Project Director, Gulf and Arabian Peninsula
3 Dec 2017
The Houthis are still strong militarily [in Yemen] and appear determined to defeat Saleh and fight for control of Sana'a. Financial Times

April Longley Alley

Project Director, Gulf and Arabian Peninsula

Latest Updates

The Killing of Former President Saleh Could Worsen Yemen’s War

The dramatic collapse of the Huthi-Saleh alliance is likely to prolong Yemen’s war and the suffering of its people. After killing former President Saleh, the Huthis, viewed by their enemies in Riyadh as Iranian proxies, are firmly in control of the capital. Neither they, nor the Saudis, are in a mood for compromise.

Also available in العربية

A Huthi Missile, a Saudi Purge and a Lebanese Resignation Shake the Middle East

Volatility is rising across the Middle East as local, regional and international conflicts increasingly intertwine and amplify each other. Four Crisis Group analysts give a 360-degree view of the new risks of overlapping conflicts that involve Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Lebanon and Israel.

The Counter-productive Isolation of Proud and Hungry Sanaa

Our Arabian Peninsula Senior Analyst April Longley Alley finds pride, resilience and an eagerness to end the conflict during field research and many conversations in Sanaa, Yemen’s capital. She concludes that isolating one side or making the famine and suffering worse will only prolong the war.

Also available in العربية

How All Sides of Yemen’s War Are Weaponising Hunger and Creating a Famine

With the world's largest hunger crisis, Yemen sits precariously on the brink of famine. Avoiding it will require all warring parties to desist from weaponising Yemen's increasingly fragile economy and return to the negotiating table.

Originally published in World Politics Review

The Houthis Are Not Hezbollah

Donald Trump wants to ramp up Yemen's proxy fight against Iran. One small problem: Tehran doesn't really have a proxy there.

Originally published in Foreign Policy

Also available in العربية